Location

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 5:20 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jennifer Lucko, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Students who are classified as being Emotionally Disturbed (ED) often struggle in the general education classroom setting because they do not receive the proper support to be the most successful. Many teachers do not understand how to work with these students due to a lack of training and understanding of the disability. Additionally, these students who typically have behavioral issues will continue to act out without forming interpersonal relationships with their teacher. Although research has demonstrated some understanding of working with these students, few studies have explored the use of language interventions and social-emotional learning to promote positive student-teacher relationships. The purpose of the research was to better understand how a focus on pragmatic language skills and social-emotional learning can impact student-teacher interpersonal relationships. This study involved conducting interviews with the teachers of students’ who are ED, and then creating a six-week one-on-one intervention that focused on pragmatic language skills and social-emotional learning. The study concluded with another set of interviews, with the classroom teachers, to see if the goals of the intervention were met. The findings from the research show that after the six-week intervention students were able to better regulate their emotions in the classroom setting. However, not all students were able to fully express their feelings when they became dysregulated. They often needed extra support and prompts from their classroom teacher, which can only happen if the teachers understand how to meet the emotional needs of these students.

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Apr 17th, 5:20 PM

Language Interventions and Social-Emotional Learning Helps Students Who Are Emotionally Disturbed

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

Students who are classified as being Emotionally Disturbed (ED) often struggle in the general education classroom setting because they do not receive the proper support to be the most successful. Many teachers do not understand how to work with these students due to a lack of training and understanding of the disability. Additionally, these students who typically have behavioral issues will continue to act out without forming interpersonal relationships with their teacher. Although research has demonstrated some understanding of working with these students, few studies have explored the use of language interventions and social-emotional learning to promote positive student-teacher relationships. The purpose of the research was to better understand how a focus on pragmatic language skills and social-emotional learning can impact student-teacher interpersonal relationships. This study involved conducting interviews with the teachers of students’ who are ED, and then creating a six-week one-on-one intervention that focused on pragmatic language skills and social-emotional learning. The study concluded with another set of interviews, with the classroom teachers, to see if the goals of the intervention were met. The findings from the research show that after the six-week intervention students were able to better regulate their emotions in the classroom setting. However, not all students were able to fully express their feelings when they became dysregulated. They often needed extra support and prompts from their classroom teacher, which can only happen if the teachers understand how to meet the emotional needs of these students.