Files

Download

Download Poster (242 KB)

Abstract

It was suggested that individuals who experience a stressful childhood may have learned from these experiences and developed a greater ability to cope with stress as adults; this ability is independent of general self-esteem. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, a Childhood Traumatic Events Scale, the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale and a Stressful Events Questionnaire were completed by 64 participants. Comparing those who had traumatic childhood experiences with those who had not, the results showed no significant group differences for the Coping Scores. Those with traumatic childhoods had significantly lower self-esteem, and had experienced higher (but not significantly different) levels of stress during past week and also in general during past three months. It was concluded that childhood traumatic experiences have little or no observable influence on how adults cope with or respond to stressful events.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Ian Madfes, Ph.D.

Publication Date

2017

City

San Rafael, CA

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Relationship of Stressful Childhood Experiences and Ability to Deal with Stress in Adulthood


Share

COinS