Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Mobile Phone Addiction and Extroversion, Introversion and Social Anxiety

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-19-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 4:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Davis, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

There has been a steady increase in the amount of time people spend on their phones, due to the many features they offer and the ability they provide to keep people connected. This increase has been so drastic that there is now a debate as to whether or not Mobile Phone Addiction will be included in a future version of the DSM. Although mobile phones have numerous positive uses, there is a growing amount of research that shows that they have a multitude of negative health and social effects. Such as decreased sleep quality, back pain, trouble concentrating, and lower self-esteem. The present study focuses on the prevalence of mobile phone addiction among college students, and the relationship between this addiction and social anxiety, extraversion and introversion. The participants consisted of approximately 50 students attending a northern California university. Data were collected from participants via an anonymous, online survey that consisted of three different measures. The first measure was Karadag’s Mobile Phone Usage Addiction Scale, which assesses people’s attachment to their phone. Participants also completed McCroskey’s Introversion Scale, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Data are still being collected, but participants’ scores on these measures will be correlated to determine the nature of the relationships among these variables. It is expected that there will be a positive relationship between high scores on mobile phone addiction and levels of social anxiety, and that mobile phone addiction will have a stronger, positive relationship with extraversion than with introversion. These hypotheses are based on past research conducted primarily in non-western countries, such as China and Japan; therefore, it will be interesting to see whether similar correlations are also present in western countries.

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Apr 19th, 3:00 PM Apr 19th, 4:00 PM

The Relationship Between Mobile Phone Addiction and Extroversion, Introversion and Social Anxiety

Guzman Lecture Hall

There has been a steady increase in the amount of time people spend on their phones, due to the many features they offer and the ability they provide to keep people connected. This increase has been so drastic that there is now a debate as to whether or not Mobile Phone Addiction will be included in a future version of the DSM. Although mobile phones have numerous positive uses, there is a growing amount of research that shows that they have a multitude of negative health and social effects. Such as decreased sleep quality, back pain, trouble concentrating, and lower self-esteem. The present study focuses on the prevalence of mobile phone addiction among college students, and the relationship between this addiction and social anxiety, extraversion and introversion. The participants consisted of approximately 50 students attending a northern California university. Data were collected from participants via an anonymous, online survey that consisted of three different measures. The first measure was Karadag’s Mobile Phone Usage Addiction Scale, which assesses people’s attachment to their phone. Participants also completed McCroskey’s Introversion Scale, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Data are still being collected, but participants’ scores on these measures will be correlated to determine the nature of the relationships among these variables. It is expected that there will be a positive relationship between high scores on mobile phone addiction and levels of social anxiety, and that mobile phone addiction will have a stronger, positive relationship with extraversion than with introversion. These hypotheses are based on past research conducted primarily in non-western countries, such as China and Japan; therefore, it will be interesting to see whether similar correlations are also present in western countries.