Presentation Title

Effect of Video Games on Players' Social Skills

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-19-2018 6:30 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Davis, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Technological advances throughout the past century have often produced concern regarding these advances’ effects on the dynamics of society. Internet use has largely affected the way in which we relate with others, allowing for faster communication with people all over the world. However, while online video games may seem socially beneficial in that they allow players to connect with one another, these games may have detrimental effects on players’ offline social interactions. For example, evidence has shown that although players seem to be better able to express and control their emotions, players who are more involved in gaming have difficulties initiating and guiding conversations. It was also found that frequency of social online game play is negatively correlated with players’ level of perceived emotional support; conveying that higher frequency of those who spend more time engaged in online game play tend to have smaller, lower-quality social circles. The present study explored the potential influence that different modalities of video games (single-player vs. multi-player video games or games played offline vs. online) may have on players’ social skills. Participants were recruited from various classes at a northern California university and through various social media sites. They participated in an anonymous online survey that consisted of the 24-item Abridged Social Skills Inventory (ASSI) and 16 additional items developed by the researcher, including various demographics and a series of questions about their video game play. While the data are still be collected, it is hypothesized that those who engage more in single-player video games will have lower scores with regard to social skills than those engaged in multi-player games. It is also expected that those who play primarily online video games will have lower scores on the ASSI than those who play offline games.

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Apr 19th, 6:30 PM Apr 19th, 7:30 PM

Effect of Video Games on Players' Social Skills

Guzman Lecture Hall

Technological advances throughout the past century have often produced concern regarding these advances’ effects on the dynamics of society. Internet use has largely affected the way in which we relate with others, allowing for faster communication with people all over the world. However, while online video games may seem socially beneficial in that they allow players to connect with one another, these games may have detrimental effects on players’ offline social interactions. For example, evidence has shown that although players seem to be better able to express and control their emotions, players who are more involved in gaming have difficulties initiating and guiding conversations. It was also found that frequency of social online game play is negatively correlated with players’ level of perceived emotional support; conveying that higher frequency of those who spend more time engaged in online game play tend to have smaller, lower-quality social circles. The present study explored the potential influence that different modalities of video games (single-player vs. multi-player video games or games played offline vs. online) may have on players’ social skills. Participants were recruited from various classes at a northern California university and through various social media sites. They participated in an anonymous online survey that consisted of the 24-item Abridged Social Skills Inventory (ASSI) and 16 additional items developed by the researcher, including various demographics and a series of questions about their video game play. While the data are still be collected, it is hypothesized that those who engage more in single-player video games will have lower scores with regard to social skills than those engaged in multi-player games. It is also expected that those who play primarily online video games will have lower scores on the ASSI than those who play offline games.