Presentation Title

Tensile Strength: A Person-Centered Perspective on Supported Living Environments for Adults with Autism

Location

Guzman 104

Start Date

4-19-2018 6:00 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 6:15 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Jacquelyn Urbani, Ph.D. and Jennifer Lucko, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The problem my research aims to address is how supported living environments for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) can best support their residents. This is an inherently human and personal problem, but existing research tackling this problem utilizing a person-centric and/or resiliency theory lens or framework is lacking. My research will use multiple perspectives to try and understand the day-to-day realities, experience, and needs of parents/guardians, staff/caregivers, and residents/adults with Autism. This is a qualitative study that uses in-person interviews with stake-holders. Taking a humanized research approach, interviews are designed to feature open-ended questions that allow researcher and community to create and share emotions and knowledge. This interview data is combined with on-site observations and information taken from residents’ Individualized Progress Plan (IPP) goals. Findings were that there was a great deal of internal and external tension for stakeholders, both within themselves and in relationships with each other. Examples of these tensions include: providing care vs. promoting independence; self-actualization vs. assimilation; and professionalism vs. friendship. These tensions pushed stakeholders to explore and evaluate difficult topics which must be addressed in order to have a truly supportive living environment. Environment and location also played a role, with physical access to shared and community spaces facilitating integration and social opportunities. Supported living environments should utilize physical space to provide social opportunities, as well as providing opportunities for stakeholders to air and explore their tensions, facilitating productive conversations, greater cohesiveness, greater trust, and more individualized supports in a third space for stakeholders.

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Apr 19th, 6:00 PM Apr 19th, 6:15 PM

Tensile Strength: A Person-Centered Perspective on Supported Living Environments for Adults with Autism

Guzman 104

The problem my research aims to address is how supported living environments for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) can best support their residents. This is an inherently human and personal problem, but existing research tackling this problem utilizing a person-centric and/or resiliency theory lens or framework is lacking. My research will use multiple perspectives to try and understand the day-to-day realities, experience, and needs of parents/guardians, staff/caregivers, and residents/adults with Autism. This is a qualitative study that uses in-person interviews with stake-holders. Taking a humanized research approach, interviews are designed to feature open-ended questions that allow researcher and community to create and share emotions and knowledge. This interview data is combined with on-site observations and information taken from residents’ Individualized Progress Plan (IPP) goals. Findings were that there was a great deal of internal and external tension for stakeholders, both within themselves and in relationships with each other. Examples of these tensions include: providing care vs. promoting independence; self-actualization vs. assimilation; and professionalism vs. friendship. These tensions pushed stakeholders to explore and evaluate difficult topics which must be addressed in order to have a truly supportive living environment. Environment and location also played a role, with physical access to shared and community spaces facilitating integration and social opportunities. Supported living environments should utilize physical space to provide social opportunities, as well as providing opportunities for stakeholders to air and explore their tensions, facilitating productive conversations, greater cohesiveness, greater trust, and more individualized supports in a third space for stakeholders.