Presentation Title

Education Level and Confidant Preference

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-19-2018 6:30 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Adult Degree Completion

Faculty Mentor

Ian S. Madfes, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This study evaluates gender and level of education differences in the factors that distinguish those who rely more on family from those who rely more on friends in difficult times, and times that require intimate confiding.

Studies have shown stronger non-family ties are becoming more common for individuals with a graduate degree, which are positively correlated with rising levels of non-family intimacy.

It is hypothesized that higher educated individuals will display a shift in social preference away from family bonds and towards non-family, colleague bonds. People who hold graduate level degrees will display a preference for a non-kin confidants over non-spousal family members.

Participants will be recruited by Email to complete measures at an online site. They will complete a demographics questionnaire, then select two individuals who they feel close enough to share intimacies; one is to be a member of their family and the other is to be a friend. Participants will then complete the Intimacy Scale to measure the closeness of the relationship with each of the individuals. Participants will complete the Preferred Confidant Questionnaire to evaluate to whom they would communicate about difficult life events.

Data will be evaluated by first determining if the participant indicated a greater likelihood of turning to a friend or family member in difficult times. The hypothesis will be supported if Intimacy scores as well as a preference for friend over family is greater for participants with higher education.

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Apr 19th, 6:30 PM Apr 19th, 7:30 PM

Education Level and Confidant Preference

Guzman Lecture Hall

This study evaluates gender and level of education differences in the factors that distinguish those who rely more on family from those who rely more on friends in difficult times, and times that require intimate confiding.

Studies have shown stronger non-family ties are becoming more common for individuals with a graduate degree, which are positively correlated with rising levels of non-family intimacy.

It is hypothesized that higher educated individuals will display a shift in social preference away from family bonds and towards non-family, colleague bonds. People who hold graduate level degrees will display a preference for a non-kin confidants over non-spousal family members.

Participants will be recruited by Email to complete measures at an online site. They will complete a demographics questionnaire, then select two individuals who they feel close enough to share intimacies; one is to be a member of their family and the other is to be a friend. Participants will then complete the Intimacy Scale to measure the closeness of the relationship with each of the individuals. Participants will complete the Preferred Confidant Questionnaire to evaluate to whom they would communicate about difficult life events.

Data will be evaluated by first determining if the participant indicated a greater likelihood of turning to a friend or family member in difficult times. The hypothesis will be supported if Intimacy scores as well as a preference for friend over family is greater for participants with higher education.