Presentation Title

Personality Traits Among Teachers

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-19-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 4:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Davis, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

There will always be a need for teaching in society and about 3.6 million individuals work in this profession at public schools in the United States. This career has a high rate of burnout and money is not currently there to attract a large number of people to the field. Personality measures are often used to help youth find a path in life. This practice does not always match those who are interested in the field and those who will be successful in it. Previous research has shown that certain personalities yield better student evaluations. The purpose of this research is to determine if personality is a motivator to teach, if correlations exist between personality and the subject or age group taught, and if the profession shapes personality over time. Approximately 75 participants were recruited in northern California at a small private university, various public schools, and a private business. Participants included both undergraduate and graduate students as well as working professionals. Graduate student participants were currently enrolled in a credential program. Non-teachers were included for the purpose of a control group. An anonymous online survey consisting of Rotter’s Internal-External Locus of Control, the Big Five personality measure, and demographic questions was given to participants. While data is still being collected, it is hypothesized that correlations exist for personality and both the subject and age level taught. It is also anticipated that the data will reveal teachers as more open, conscientious, and agreeable than non-teachers. Teachers are also expected to have a more internal locus of control than the general population. Lastly, research is expected to find more extreme values for the previously mentioned variables for teachers who have worked longer in the profession. This research is important in understanding any differences between those motivated to teach and those who succeed in doing so. The data obtained also may help understand and avoid the turnover that exists in the profession today.

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Apr 19th, 3:00 PM Apr 19th, 4:00 PM

Personality Traits Among Teachers

Guzman Lecture Hall

There will always be a need for teaching in society and about 3.6 million individuals work in this profession at public schools in the United States. This career has a high rate of burnout and money is not currently there to attract a large number of people to the field. Personality measures are often used to help youth find a path in life. This practice does not always match those who are interested in the field and those who will be successful in it. Previous research has shown that certain personalities yield better student evaluations. The purpose of this research is to determine if personality is a motivator to teach, if correlations exist between personality and the subject or age group taught, and if the profession shapes personality over time. Approximately 75 participants were recruited in northern California at a small private university, various public schools, and a private business. Participants included both undergraduate and graduate students as well as working professionals. Graduate student participants were currently enrolled in a credential program. Non-teachers were included for the purpose of a control group. An anonymous online survey consisting of Rotter’s Internal-External Locus of Control, the Big Five personality measure, and demographic questions was given to participants. While data is still being collected, it is hypothesized that correlations exist for personality and both the subject and age level taught. It is also anticipated that the data will reveal teachers as more open, conscientious, and agreeable than non-teachers. Teachers are also expected to have a more internal locus of control than the general population. Lastly, research is expected to find more extreme values for the previously mentioned variables for teachers who have worked longer in the profession. This research is important in understanding any differences between those motivated to teach and those who succeed in doing so. The data obtained also may help understand and avoid the turnover that exists in the profession today.