Presentation Title

Relationship of Levels of Hand-Eye Coordination and Reaction Time Skills and Level of Competitiveness to an Individual’s Decision To Play Video Games

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall

Start Date

4-19-2018 6:30 PM

End Date

4-19-2018 7:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Ian Madfes, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This study will compare gamers and non-gamers to distinguish potentials reasons for the choice to play and how these may be related to the potential for successful gaming experiences.

Previous research found that repeated video gaming experience allowed for faster processing of signals both during the video game and with similar tasks outside of the video game. Thus, expertise in video gaming appears to actually improve visual-motor functioning in a generalized way (Granek el al, 2010). There is emerging evidence that individuals with extensive gaming experience have improved internal processing after the visual stimulus is received and faster eye-hand coordination is correlated with improved gaming skills (Cain et al, 2014). In addition, the role of competition in video games appears to be related to key aspects of enjoyment and the incidence of aggression related to video games (Vorderer et al, 2003). Thus it is important to gain a better understanding of the competitive dynamics of video game play.

Like most “game” environments, winning is positively reinforcing. Given the pattern of high levels of hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness are possible factors on the likelihood of success, leading to greater levels of game play. It is hypothesized that higher skill levels in hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness will increase the likelihood of an individual playing video games and increase level of success at playing them.

Methodology includes online data collection of gaming information, levels of hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness. Results will be available in April 2018.

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Apr 19th, 6:30 PM Apr 19th, 7:30 PM

Relationship of Levels of Hand-Eye Coordination and Reaction Time Skills and Level of Competitiveness to an Individual’s Decision To Play Video Games

Guzman Lecture Hall

This study will compare gamers and non-gamers to distinguish potentials reasons for the choice to play and how these may be related to the potential for successful gaming experiences.

Previous research found that repeated video gaming experience allowed for faster processing of signals both during the video game and with similar tasks outside of the video game. Thus, expertise in video gaming appears to actually improve visual-motor functioning in a generalized way (Granek el al, 2010). There is emerging evidence that individuals with extensive gaming experience have improved internal processing after the visual stimulus is received and faster eye-hand coordination is correlated with improved gaming skills (Cain et al, 2014). In addition, the role of competition in video games appears to be related to key aspects of enjoyment and the incidence of aggression related to video games (Vorderer et al, 2003). Thus it is important to gain a better understanding of the competitive dynamics of video game play.

Like most “game” environments, winning is positively reinforcing. Given the pattern of high levels of hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness are possible factors on the likelihood of success, leading to greater levels of game play. It is hypothesized that higher skill levels in hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness will increase the likelihood of an individual playing video games and increase level of success at playing them.

Methodology includes online data collection of gaming information, levels of hand-eye coordination, reflex times and competitiveness. Results will be available in April 2018.