Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Birth Order and Chronic Illness Management in Adults

Location

Online - Session 6C

Start Date

4-21-2021 6:00 PM

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Second Major

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ian Madfes, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

It is known that people get sick due to many possible reasons throughout their lifetime. Some of those illness come and go; other may linger even for a lifetime. Managing such chronic illness is a challenge that only some are able to do reasonably well (Huangfu, 2020). This study will endeavor to better understand what characteristics may be present for people who can manage chronic illness better than others.

We are all a product of our experiences, particularly those which occurred in childhood. Some people are born and remain an only child; most others have siblings. There is a body of research that suggests birth order and history of living together results in siblings having different characteristics (Ergüner et al., 2016). Younger siblings have been shown to be better at adapting to life changes because they are more likely to create their own paths in life. First and only born children are more likely to follow in the steps of parents and need not to be as creative.

Illness, particularly chronic illness, can be a life changing event. When there is a significant change in life, those who are more flexible, more creative and more adaptable will have an easier time making adjustments to such a change (Temprado et al., 2019). If sibling birth order affects the adaptive skills of individuals, it is reasonable to conclude that this may also affect how people manage chronic illness. When a chronic illness occurs, the creative and flexible adaptability of younger children will be greater and more effective for coping than the skills of older and only born children. Therefore, it is hypothesized that younger siblings are more likely as adults to manage chronic illness better than first and only born children.

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM

The Relationship Between Birth Order and Chronic Illness Management in Adults

Online - Session 6C

It is known that people get sick due to many possible reasons throughout their lifetime. Some of those illness come and go; other may linger even for a lifetime. Managing such chronic illness is a challenge that only some are able to do reasonably well (Huangfu, 2020). This study will endeavor to better understand what characteristics may be present for people who can manage chronic illness better than others.

We are all a product of our experiences, particularly those which occurred in childhood. Some people are born and remain an only child; most others have siblings. There is a body of research that suggests birth order and history of living together results in siblings having different characteristics (Ergüner et al., 2016). Younger siblings have been shown to be better at adapting to life changes because they are more likely to create their own paths in life. First and only born children are more likely to follow in the steps of parents and need not to be as creative.

Illness, particularly chronic illness, can be a life changing event. When there is a significant change in life, those who are more flexible, more creative and more adaptable will have an easier time making adjustments to such a change (Temprado et al., 2019). If sibling birth order affects the adaptive skills of individuals, it is reasonable to conclude that this may also affect how people manage chronic illness. When a chronic illness occurs, the creative and flexible adaptability of younger children will be greater and more effective for coping than the skills of older and only born children. Therefore, it is hypothesized that younger siblings are more likely as adults to manage chronic illness better than first and only born children.