Presentation Title

Internalized Racial Oppression (IRO) and Perceived Racial Discrimination Among Asians and Asian-Americans During COVID-19

Location

Online - Session 4E

Start Date

4-21-2021 2:30 PM

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, Phd

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Oftentimes, people of color who are victimized by racism internalize this hate and discrimination, resulting in mocking their own accent or perpetuating stereotypes about their own race. These behaviors and beliefs are referred to as Internalized Racial Oppression (IRO; Trieu & Lee, 2018). The impact of COVID-19 has caused marginalized groups, including Asians and Asian-Americans to be further victimized (Litam, 2020). Attacks against Asian-Americans have substantially escalated across the U.S. (CAPAC, 2020) which may cause health disparities and race-based trauma in Chinese people and those of Asian descent. The goal of this study is to examine the effects of IRO alongside perceived racial discrimination, on Asians and Asian-Americans, especially in their levels of self-esteem, psychological distress, and racial discrimination in general and during COVID-19. This study included a sample of approximately 90 participants that were recruited from college institutions and social media platforms, Instagram and Facebook. The Appropriated Racial Oppression Scale (AROS; Campón & Carter, 2015) , The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965), Racial Discrimination Measure (Sangalang, et al., 2015), and The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale-Extended Version (EK10; Donker, et al., 2010) were used to measure the experiences in Asians and Asian-Americans. This research is expected to support previous evidence that internalizing oppression is significantly correlated with mental distress and perceived racial discrimination can effect an individual’s psychological well-being. Further, it may provide a more holistic conceptualization of racism that can capture the experiences and undermining feelings of IRO and perceived racial discrimination in Asians and Asian-Americans, similar effects on different ethno-racial minorities, and possible means for future interventions. Our understanding of these implications and differences could help foster a better understanding for all.

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Apr 21st, 2:30 PM

Internalized Racial Oppression (IRO) and Perceived Racial Discrimination Among Asians and Asian-Americans During COVID-19

Online - Session 4E

Oftentimes, people of color who are victimized by racism internalize this hate and discrimination, resulting in mocking their own accent or perpetuating stereotypes about their own race. These behaviors and beliefs are referred to as Internalized Racial Oppression (IRO; Trieu & Lee, 2018). The impact of COVID-19 has caused marginalized groups, including Asians and Asian-Americans to be further victimized (Litam, 2020). Attacks against Asian-Americans have substantially escalated across the U.S. (CAPAC, 2020) which may cause health disparities and race-based trauma in Chinese people and those of Asian descent. The goal of this study is to examine the effects of IRO alongside perceived racial discrimination, on Asians and Asian-Americans, especially in their levels of self-esteem, psychological distress, and racial discrimination in general and during COVID-19. This study included a sample of approximately 90 participants that were recruited from college institutions and social media platforms, Instagram and Facebook. The Appropriated Racial Oppression Scale (AROS; Campón & Carter, 2015) , The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965), Racial Discrimination Measure (Sangalang, et al., 2015), and The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale-Extended Version (EK10; Donker, et al., 2010) were used to measure the experiences in Asians and Asian-Americans. This research is expected to support previous evidence that internalizing oppression is significantly correlated with mental distress and perceived racial discrimination can effect an individual’s psychological well-being. Further, it may provide a more holistic conceptualization of racism that can capture the experiences and undermining feelings of IRO and perceived racial discrimination in Asians and Asian-Americans, similar effects on different ethno-racial minorities, and possible means for future interventions. Our understanding of these implications and differences could help foster a better understanding for all.