Presentation Title

The Effects of Self Isolation on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Levels

Location

Online - Session 4E

Start Date

4-21-2021 2:30 PM

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, Phd

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Self isolation occurs when a person is in their home or any space that is secluded for a long period of time with barely any human interaction. A study in Canada showed people were experiencing quadruple the normal levels for anxiety and double the levels of depression during the required self isolation (Dozios, 2020) brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of this research is to determine how much self isolation affects anxiety, depression, and stress levels. The study included 30 students and community participants from Northern California. Participants were asked to complete a survey based on their emotional status during the mandatory COVID-19 self isolation. The survey is scaled like the Likert scale based on a 5 point rating 1= extremely low to 5= extremely high (McLeod, 2020). This scale is designed to allow the participants to show how much they disagree or agree with the statement. Also, the participants are asked two demographic questions at the end of the survey which are their age and gender which is optional. Social isolation in this study will be measured through a UCLA Loneliness scale (Russel, 1980). Finally, the way of measuring anxiety, depression, and stress will be found through the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (Lovibond, 2012). The study is expected to show the negative effects that mandatory self isolation has on mental health. This research supports previous studies that show self isolation has a direct correlation with an increase in stress, anxiety, and depression levels (Taylor, 2020), and brings awareness to the issues of mental health and need for additional support to help people through this difficult time.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 2:30 PM

The Effects of Self Isolation on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Levels

Online - Session 4E

Self isolation occurs when a person is in their home or any space that is secluded for a long period of time with barely any human interaction. A study in Canada showed people were experiencing quadruple the normal levels for anxiety and double the levels of depression during the required self isolation (Dozios, 2020) brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of this research is to determine how much self isolation affects anxiety, depression, and stress levels. The study included 30 students and community participants from Northern California. Participants were asked to complete a survey based on their emotional status during the mandatory COVID-19 self isolation. The survey is scaled like the Likert scale based on a 5 point rating 1= extremely low to 5= extremely high (McLeod, 2020). This scale is designed to allow the participants to show how much they disagree or agree with the statement. Also, the participants are asked two demographic questions at the end of the survey which are their age and gender which is optional. Social isolation in this study will be measured through a UCLA Loneliness scale (Russel, 1980). Finally, the way of measuring anxiety, depression, and stress will be found through the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (Lovibond, 2012). The study is expected to show the negative effects that mandatory self isolation has on mental health. This research supports previous studies that show self isolation has a direct correlation with an increase in stress, anxiety, and depression levels (Taylor, 2020), and brings awareness to the issues of mental health and need for additional support to help people through this difficult time.