Presentation Title

Self Perception of Dental Esthetics and Its Impact Among Adults Self Esteem in Sonoma and Marin County

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Global Public Health

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michaela George, MPH, PhD and Brett Bayles, MPH, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Oral health is an integral element in an individual’s general health and overall well-being. The mouth can be a determinant of many diseases including diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and some cancer markers. The oral cavity is also considered a general reflection of an individual’s health status. (World Health Organization et al., 2018, Colgate et al., 2019, Mayo Clinic et al., 2019) Oral diseases and disorders can contribute to misalignment, structure conditions, and have an overall impact on dental appearance, interrupting an individual’s perception of self-image, along with social interaction, affecting self-esteem, and mental health. (Dumitrescu et al., 2014) According to the American Dental Association (ADA), one in four adults refrain from smiling, and 23% feel a sense of embarrassment attributable to oral health status. Within the United States, 22% of younger adults decrease interpersonal communication, therefore reducing social interactions due to poor oral health status. (American Dental Association et al., 2015) Dental esthetics is significant for most individuals, especially when it comes to physical appearance, self-esteem, personal attractiveness, and mental health. (Kenealy et al., 1984, Theunissen et al., 2014, Dion, et al., 1972) Previous research surrounding this area of dental esthetics varies in relation to its impact on self-esteem, and results are inconsistent (Alkhatib et al., 2005, Karasneh et al., 2009). This study will utilize surveys and focus groups to determine if there is an association between self-perception of dental esthetics and general self-esteem.

References

Alkhatib MN, Holt R, Bedi R (2005) Age and perception of dental appearance and tooth colour. Gerodontology 22: 32-36. 16.

American Dental Association, ADA. (2015). Oral health and well being in the US. Retrieved fromhttps://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/HPI/OralHealthWell-Being-StateFacts/US-Oral-Health-Well-Being.pdf?la=en

Colgate-Palmolive Company. (2019). Oral health and overall health: Why A healthy mouth is good for your body. Retrieved from https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

Dion K K, Berscheid E, Walster E. (1972) What is beautiful is good. Journal of personality and Social Psychology 24:285-290

Dumitrescu, A. L., Dogaru, C. B., Duţă, C., Zetu, I., & Zetu, L. (2014). The inter-relationships between body dissatisfaction, body image disturbance and oral health. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 127, 368-372. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.03.273

Karasneh J, Al-Omiri MK, Al-Hamad KQ, Al Quran FA (2009) Relationship between patients’ oral health-related quality of life, satisfaction with dentition, and personality profiles. J Contemp Dent Pract 10: E049-56.

Kenealy, P., Frude, N., & Shaw, W. (1989). An evaluation of the psychological and social effects of malocclusion: Some implications for dental policy making. Social Science & Medicine, 28(6), 583-591. doi:10.1016/0277-9536(89)90253-0

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2019). Oral health: A window to your overall health. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

Theunissen, Stephanie C P M, Rieffe, C., Netten, A. P., Briaire, J. J., Soede, W., Kouwenberg, M., & Frijns, J. H. M. (2014). Self-esteem in hearing-impaired children: The influence of communication, education, and audiological characteristics. PloS One, 9(4), e94521. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094521

World Health Organization, WHO. (2018). Oral health. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/oral-health

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Self Perception of Dental Esthetics and Its Impact Among Adults Self Esteem in Sonoma and Marin County

Oral health is an integral element in an individual’s general health and overall well-being. The mouth can be a determinant of many diseases including diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and some cancer markers. The oral cavity is also considered a general reflection of an individual’s health status. (World Health Organization et al., 2018, Colgate et al., 2019, Mayo Clinic et al., 2019) Oral diseases and disorders can contribute to misalignment, structure conditions, and have an overall impact on dental appearance, interrupting an individual’s perception of self-image, along with social interaction, affecting self-esteem, and mental health. (Dumitrescu et al., 2014) According to the American Dental Association (ADA), one in four adults refrain from smiling, and 23% feel a sense of embarrassment attributable to oral health status. Within the United States, 22% of younger adults decrease interpersonal communication, therefore reducing social interactions due to poor oral health status. (American Dental Association et al., 2015) Dental esthetics is significant for most individuals, especially when it comes to physical appearance, self-esteem, personal attractiveness, and mental health. (Kenealy et al., 1984, Theunissen et al., 2014, Dion, et al., 1972) Previous research surrounding this area of dental esthetics varies in relation to its impact on self-esteem, and results are inconsistent (Alkhatib et al., 2005, Karasneh et al., 2009). This study will utilize surveys and focus groups to determine if there is an association between self-perception of dental esthetics and general self-esteem.

References

Alkhatib MN, Holt R, Bedi R (2005) Age and perception of dental appearance and tooth colour. Gerodontology 22: 32-36. 16.

American Dental Association, ADA. (2015). Oral health and well being in the US. Retrieved fromhttps://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/HPI/OralHealthWell-Being-StateFacts/US-Oral-Health-Well-Being.pdf?la=en

Colgate-Palmolive Company. (2019). Oral health and overall health: Why A healthy mouth is good for your body. Retrieved from https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

Dion K K, Berscheid E, Walster E. (1972) What is beautiful is good. Journal of personality and Social Psychology 24:285-290

Dumitrescu, A. L., Dogaru, C. B., Duţă, C., Zetu, I., & Zetu, L. (2014). The inter-relationships between body dissatisfaction, body image disturbance and oral health. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 127, 368-372. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.03.273

Karasneh J, Al-Omiri MK, Al-Hamad KQ, Al Quran FA (2009) Relationship between patients’ oral health-related quality of life, satisfaction with dentition, and personality profiles. J Contemp Dent Pract 10: E049-56.

Kenealy, P., Frude, N., & Shaw, W. (1989). An evaluation of the psychological and social effects of malocclusion: Some implications for dental policy making. Social Science & Medicine, 28(6), 583-591. doi:10.1016/0277-9536(89)90253-0

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2019). Oral health: A window to your overall health. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

Theunissen, Stephanie C P M, Rieffe, C., Netten, A. P., Briaire, J. J., Soede, W., Kouwenberg, M., & Frijns, J. H. M. (2014). Self-esteem in hearing-impaired children: The influence of communication, education, and audiological characteristics. PloS One, 9(4), e94521. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094521

World Health Organization, WHO. (2018). Oral health. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/oral-health