Presentation Title

Adaptive Video Gaming in the Classroom

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Occupational Therapy

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Laura Greiss Hess, PhD, OTR/L

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Technology influences all occupations, and video games can be considered the modern form of play (Smith, 2017). Video games lead to motor and social benefits, as well as influencing the cognition of gamers (Granic, Lobel & Engles, 2014; Hsieh et al., 2015; Sandlund et al., 2014). In children, these social benefits can be seen through peer training and scaffolding. Through social learning, a peer can more easily transfer the learning to their experience (Clinton & Wilson, 2019; Dukuzumuremyi & Siklanderp, 2018). Peer training is a pertinent tool in the educational standard of collaboration and social engagement (California State Board of Education, 2013). The Microsoft® Xbox adaptive video game controller (adapted controller) is a form of universally designed controller that allows for inclusive video gameplay for people with physical disabilities. The adapted controller was designed in collaboration with three occupational therapists (Yamkovenko, 2019). However, no research has been done utilizing the adaptive controller describing how it works and its benefits, especially within the classroom. Therefore, the purpose of our project is to create a program that implements the adaptive gaming system in the school day to benefit the students who may be unable to engage in play with peers at school. Our capstone team developed a website to support use of the Microsoft Xbox Adaptive Controller in the classroom.

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Adaptive Video Gaming in the Classroom

Technology influences all occupations, and video games can be considered the modern form of play (Smith, 2017). Video games lead to motor and social benefits, as well as influencing the cognition of gamers (Granic, Lobel & Engles, 2014; Hsieh et al., 2015; Sandlund et al., 2014). In children, these social benefits can be seen through peer training and scaffolding. Through social learning, a peer can more easily transfer the learning to their experience (Clinton & Wilson, 2019; Dukuzumuremyi & Siklanderp, 2018). Peer training is a pertinent tool in the educational standard of collaboration and social engagement (California State Board of Education, 2013). The Microsoft® Xbox adaptive video game controller (adapted controller) is a form of universally designed controller that allows for inclusive video gameplay for people with physical disabilities. The adapted controller was designed in collaboration with three occupational therapists (Yamkovenko, 2019). However, no research has been done utilizing the adaptive controller describing how it works and its benefits, especially within the classroom. Therefore, the purpose of our project is to create a program that implements the adaptive gaming system in the school day to benefit the students who may be unable to engage in play with peers at school. Our capstone team developed a website to support use of the Microsoft Xbox Adaptive Controller in the classroom.