Presentation Title

Mental Illness Stigma Among Different Cultures

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

William Phillips, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Stigma towards mental illness has been extremely prevalent among people of all ages and racial backgrounds. Cultural upbringing can play a role in the negative perceptions towards mental illness. Research has shown that many Asian-Americans have feelings of shame towards mental illness and that Latinos tend to feel more embarrassed about having a mental illness and getting treatment, compared to non-Latino Whites. The present study examined the differences in stigma among college aged people compared to their cultural views. Participants were asked to complete a survey with a stereotype scale and demographic questions. Questions were asked about their parents regarding their highest level of education, if they are first generation immigrants of the U.S., and how long have they been living in the U.S. The scale measured the degree of negative stereotypes that people feel towards others who suffer from a mental illness. It is hypothesized that the levels of stigma towards mental illness will reveal less differences among college aged people than the differences in stigma among cultures as a whole. The second hypothesis was that students who have been living in the United States for a longer amount of time will show less stigma towards mental illness. The data of the college participants' stigma was compared to archival stigma data from their racial group (Jimenez et al., 2013). Lastly, it was hypothesized that college students of parents with lower levels of education will show higher levels of stigma towards mental illness.

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Mental Illness Stigma Among Different Cultures

Stigma towards mental illness has been extremely prevalent among people of all ages and racial backgrounds. Cultural upbringing can play a role in the negative perceptions towards mental illness. Research has shown that many Asian-Americans have feelings of shame towards mental illness and that Latinos tend to feel more embarrassed about having a mental illness and getting treatment, compared to non-Latino Whites. The present study examined the differences in stigma among college aged people compared to their cultural views. Participants were asked to complete a survey with a stereotype scale and demographic questions. Questions were asked about their parents regarding their highest level of education, if they are first generation immigrants of the U.S., and how long have they been living in the U.S. The scale measured the degree of negative stereotypes that people feel towards others who suffer from a mental illness. It is hypothesized that the levels of stigma towards mental illness will reveal less differences among college aged people than the differences in stigma among cultures as a whole. The second hypothesis was that students who have been living in the United States for a longer amount of time will show less stigma towards mental illness. The data of the college participants' stigma was compared to archival stigma data from their racial group (Jimenez et al., 2013). Lastly, it was hypothesized that college students of parents with lower levels of education will show higher levels of stigma towards mental illness.