Presentation Title

Emotion Expressive Difference Between Men and Women

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

William Phillips, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

In our society, women are commonly regarded as emotional beings who have an easier time expressing their emotions compared to men (Kring & Gordon, 1998). This concept has led people to label certain emotional characteristics to either males or females specifically. There are certain emotional social role that are linked to the responsibilities of males or females individually. Hence, men who express emotions such as crying or sadness are perceived as vulnerable because they have violated gender and social norm (Magen and Konasewich, 2011). The present study aimed to scrutinize the emotional expression difference between male and female university students in the realm of daily television exposure such as movies and commercials. All participants will be recruited from a small liberal arts college in Northern California and will be sent an email containing a link to a survey-based website Google Forms. The survey questions will include the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS; Jones, Bastian, & Jones, 2016). Participants will also be required to answer a few common demographic questions. The BMIS intends to measure the susceptibility of four different emotions which include anger, fear, sadness, and happiness. Each participant will then watch one of the four movie clips demonstrating the four different types of emotions. Lastly, participants will be asked a series of questions in response to the video clips to determine their emotional state. It is hypothesized that: 1) Men are more likely to repress emotions like sadness, fear, and happiness, 2) women are more likely to display emotions like sadness, fear, and happiness, and 3) men are more likely to exhibit anger emotion compared to men. Data for this project will be collected in Spring 2020.

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Emotion Expressive Difference Between Men and Women

In our society, women are commonly regarded as emotional beings who have an easier time expressing their emotions compared to men (Kring & Gordon, 1998). This concept has led people to label certain emotional characteristics to either males or females specifically. There are certain emotional social role that are linked to the responsibilities of males or females individually. Hence, men who express emotions such as crying or sadness are perceived as vulnerable because they have violated gender and social norm (Magen and Konasewich, 2011). The present study aimed to scrutinize the emotional expression difference between male and female university students in the realm of daily television exposure such as movies and commercials. All participants will be recruited from a small liberal arts college in Northern California and will be sent an email containing a link to a survey-based website Google Forms. The survey questions will include the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS; Jones, Bastian, & Jones, 2016). Participants will also be required to answer a few common demographic questions. The BMIS intends to measure the susceptibility of four different emotions which include anger, fear, sadness, and happiness. Each participant will then watch one of the four movie clips demonstrating the four different types of emotions. Lastly, participants will be asked a series of questions in response to the video clips to determine their emotional state. It is hypothesized that: 1) Men are more likely to repress emotions like sadness, fear, and happiness, 2) women are more likely to display emotions like sadness, fear, and happiness, and 3) men are more likely to exhibit anger emotion compared to men. Data for this project will be collected in Spring 2020.