Presentation Title

The Effect of Positive Affirmations on Self-Esteem and Well-Being in College Students

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Spontaneous other- and self-affirmation have been associated with greater levels of happiness, hopefulness, and more health benefits (Emmanuel et al., 2018). Affirming core values lead to increases in self-esteem, eudaimonic well-being, and positive attitudes towards oneself and others in more vulnerable individuals (Düring & Jessop, 2015; Nelson et al., 2014). Beyond the benefits to the individual, those who received affirmations become more likely to affirm their peers for the following weeks (Warren et al., 2013). The goal of the present study is to examine how virtual affirmations via mobile app or text message can increase self-esteem and well-being.

Thirty-seven participants were recruited from a private, liberal arts university in Northern California. The sample was predominantly female and of traditional college age. A survey was emailed to students enrolled in psychology courses that measured self-esteem and well-being, then randomly assigned to either the mobile app or the text condition. Each participant received two virtual affirmations daily for two weeks. After the final day, participants were sent a posttest survey including the same measures as the first. The survey consisted of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), the Flourishing Scale (Diener & Biswas-Diener, 2009), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener et al., 1985) to measure self-esteem and well-being.

Results of the paired samples t-test are expected to show that virtual positive affirmations increased college students’ well-being and self-esteem. Independent samples t-tests that compare text message and app based affirmations are expected to show that affirmative comments given via text will have a greater positive impact on the individual in comparison to affirmations given by a mobile app.

keywords: affirmation, self-esteem, well-being

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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The Effect of Positive Affirmations on Self-Esteem and Well-Being in College Students

Spontaneous other- and self-affirmation have been associated with greater levels of happiness, hopefulness, and more health benefits (Emmanuel et al., 2018). Affirming core values lead to increases in self-esteem, eudaimonic well-being, and positive attitudes towards oneself and others in more vulnerable individuals (Düring & Jessop, 2015; Nelson et al., 2014). Beyond the benefits to the individual, those who received affirmations become more likely to affirm their peers for the following weeks (Warren et al., 2013). The goal of the present study is to examine how virtual affirmations via mobile app or text message can increase self-esteem and well-being.

Thirty-seven participants were recruited from a private, liberal arts university in Northern California. The sample was predominantly female and of traditional college age. A survey was emailed to students enrolled in psychology courses that measured self-esteem and well-being, then randomly assigned to either the mobile app or the text condition. Each participant received two virtual affirmations daily for two weeks. After the final day, participants were sent a posttest survey including the same measures as the first. The survey consisted of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), the Flourishing Scale (Diener & Biswas-Diener, 2009), and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener et al., 1985) to measure self-esteem and well-being.

Results of the paired samples t-test are expected to show that virtual positive affirmations increased college students’ well-being and self-esteem. Independent samples t-tests that compare text message and app based affirmations are expected to show that affirmative comments given via text will have a greater positive impact on the individual in comparison to affirmations given by a mobile app.

keywords: affirmation, self-esteem, well-being