Presentation Title

Midline Movement: The Affects in a Kindergarten Classroom

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Matthew E. Davis, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Educators are realizing the unrealistic expectations on students to be quiet and sit still for extended periods of their day (Donnelly, & Lambourne, 2011). The education system is reintroducing movement into the school days after large amounts of research have proven the importance of extracurricular activities on developing the whole child (Hannaford, 1995). Movement, connection, touch, play, and creative endeavors have been proven to be critical components to teaching students to be well-rounded individuals of society (Hannaford, 1995). This study explores how movements and activities that cross an individual’s midline affect student’s focus and ability to learn in the classroom. Cultivating an understanding of the importance of midline movements in the classroom is how we are going to create buy-in for schools and teachers to join this movement. In turn, students will then reap the benefits that midline movements can provide for them.

The purpose of this study was to create awareness and open up a larger conversation about the benefit to students from midline movements that has not been brought up in any research up to this point. The researcher conducted a study in a Kindergarten classroom at an elementary school in northern California. It involved the collection of qualitative data. The study focused on how students felt in their body following the completion of midline movements or not. The findings suggest a correlation between completing midline movements and a student’s self-awareness, body awareness, and situational awareness in the classroom.

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Midline Movement: The Affects in a Kindergarten Classroom

Educators are realizing the unrealistic expectations on students to be quiet and sit still for extended periods of their day (Donnelly, & Lambourne, 2011). The education system is reintroducing movement into the school days after large amounts of research have proven the importance of extracurricular activities on developing the whole child (Hannaford, 1995). Movement, connection, touch, play, and creative endeavors have been proven to be critical components to teaching students to be well-rounded individuals of society (Hannaford, 1995). This study explores how movements and activities that cross an individual’s midline affect student’s focus and ability to learn in the classroom. Cultivating an understanding of the importance of midline movements in the classroom is how we are going to create buy-in for schools and teachers to join this movement. In turn, students will then reap the benefits that midline movements can provide for them.

The purpose of this study was to create awareness and open up a larger conversation about the benefit to students from midline movements that has not been brought up in any research up to this point. The researcher conducted a study in a Kindergarten classroom at an elementary school in northern California. It involved the collection of qualitative data. The study focused on how students felt in their body following the completion of midline movements or not. The findings suggest a correlation between completing midline movements and a student’s self-awareness, body awareness, and situational awareness in the classroom.