Presentation Title

Is reduced consumption of (processed) meat associated with a decreased prevalence of chronic diseases among adults over 18 years old?

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Global Public Health

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patti Culross, MD, MPH

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Red and processed meat intake have been positively associated with the risk of several major chronic diseases. A high consumption of processed meat products in relation to the risk of multiple chronic diseases has been studied extensively in reviews and meta-analyses. These analyses have led to recommendations to moderate the consumption of processed and preserved meat, such as sausages, salami, bacon and ham worldwide (WHO, 2003 & European IARC, 2017 & Nordisk, 2012.) Research has shown that diets low in meat consumption, such as the Mediterranean diet, can provide protection against coronary heart disease (Mente, 2009 & Vincent-Baudry et al., 2005 & Esposito et al., 2004 & Shai et al., 2008). How does one eat less meat especially when our westernized diet considers red meat a necessary part to complete our nightly dinners?



World Health Organization. Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases: Report of a

Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2003.

European Code Against cancer: IARC/WHO. 2017. 2017.

Nordisk M. Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012: integrating nutrition and physical activity.

5th edition ed. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers; 2014.

Mente A, de Koning L, Shannon HS, Anand SS. A systematic review of the evidence supporting

a causal link between dietary factors and coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med 2009;169:659-669

Vincent-Baudry, S., Defoort, C., Gerber, M., Bernard, M. C., Verger, P., Helal, O., ... & Vague, P.

(2005). The Medi-RIVAGE study: reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors after a 3-mo intervention with a Mediterranean-type diet or a low-fat diet. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 82(5), 964-971.

Esposito, K., Marfella, R., Ciotola, M., Di Palo, C., Giugliano, F., Giugliano, G., ... & Giugliano,

D. (2004). Effect of a Mediterranean-style diet on endothelial dysfunction and markers of vascular inflammation in the metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial. Jama, 292(12), 1440-1446.

Shai, I., Schwarzfuchs, D., Henkin, Y., Shahar, D. R., Witkow, S., Greenberg, I., ... &

Tangi-Rozental, O. (2008). Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet. New England Journal of Medicine, 359(3), 229-241.

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

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Is reduced consumption of (processed) meat associated with a decreased prevalence of chronic diseases among adults over 18 years old?

Red and processed meat intake have been positively associated with the risk of several major chronic diseases. A high consumption of processed meat products in relation to the risk of multiple chronic diseases has been studied extensively in reviews and meta-analyses. These analyses have led to recommendations to moderate the consumption of processed and preserved meat, such as sausages, salami, bacon and ham worldwide (WHO, 2003 & European IARC, 2017 & Nordisk, 2012.) Research has shown that diets low in meat consumption, such as the Mediterranean diet, can provide protection against coronary heart disease (Mente, 2009 & Vincent-Baudry et al., 2005 & Esposito et al., 2004 & Shai et al., 2008). How does one eat less meat especially when our westernized diet considers red meat a necessary part to complete our nightly dinners?



World Health Organization. Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases: Report of a

Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2003.

European Code Against cancer: IARC/WHO. 2017. 2017.

Nordisk M. Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012: integrating nutrition and physical activity.

5th edition ed. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers; 2014.

Mente A, de Koning L, Shannon HS, Anand SS. A systematic review of the evidence supporting

a causal link between dietary factors and coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med 2009;169:659-669

Vincent-Baudry, S., Defoort, C., Gerber, M., Bernard, M. C., Verger, P., Helal, O., ... & Vague, P.

(2005). The Medi-RIVAGE study: reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors after a 3-mo intervention with a Mediterranean-type diet or a low-fat diet. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 82(5), 964-971.

Esposito, K., Marfella, R., Ciotola, M., Di Palo, C., Giugliano, F., Giugliano, G., ... & Giugliano,

D. (2004). Effect of a Mediterranean-style diet on endothelial dysfunction and markers of vascular inflammation in the metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial. Jama, 292(12), 1440-1446.

Shai, I., Schwarzfuchs, D., Henkin, Y., Shahar, D. R., Witkow, S., Greenberg, I., ... &

Tangi-Rozental, O. (2008). Weight loss with a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean, or low-fat diet. New England Journal of Medicine, 359(3), 229-241.