Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Low Socioeconomic Status and Mortality Rates of School Age Children Related to Motor Vehicle Accidents

Start Date

April 2020

End Date

April 2020

Major Field of Study

Nursing

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor(s)

Patricia Harris, PhD, RN, CNS

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The purpose of this study is to assess nurses’ perceptions on the relationship between low socioeconomic status and high mortality rates of children due to motor vehicle accidents(MVAs). MVAs are the leading cause of death among children four years and older. Studies reviewed in this paper support that low socioeconomic status is associated with high child mortality rates caused by motor vehicle accidents. Factors contributing to these high mortality rates include: the lack of or improper use of restraints, low parental education attainment levels, black or Hispanic race, and environmental risks of low socioeconomic areas. A qualitative pilot study is conducted to examine pediatric and NICU nurses’ perceptions on the relationship between low socioeconomic status and high mortality rates of children related to MVAs. Possible nursing interventions to increase the use of car seats primarily involving patient education, are discussed as well.

Keywords: low socioeconomic status, motor vehicle accidents, mortality rates, car seat

Comments

This presentation was accepted for the Scholarly and Creative Works Conference at Dominican University of California. The Conference was canceled due to the Covid-19 Pandemic

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 22nd, 10:00 AM Apr 22nd, 8:00 PM

The Relationship Between Low Socioeconomic Status and Mortality Rates of School Age Children Related to Motor Vehicle Accidents

The purpose of this study is to assess nurses’ perceptions on the relationship between low socioeconomic status and high mortality rates of children due to motor vehicle accidents(MVAs). MVAs are the leading cause of death among children four years and older. Studies reviewed in this paper support that low socioeconomic status is associated with high child mortality rates caused by motor vehicle accidents. Factors contributing to these high mortality rates include: the lack of or improper use of restraints, low parental education attainment levels, black or Hispanic race, and environmental risks of low socioeconomic areas. A qualitative pilot study is conducted to examine pediatric and NICU nurses’ perceptions on the relationship between low socioeconomic status and high mortality rates of children related to MVAs. Possible nursing interventions to increase the use of car seats primarily involving patient education, are discussed as well.

Keywords: low socioeconomic status, motor vehicle accidents, mortality rates, car seat