Presentation Title

The Effects of Perceived Discrimination and Acculturative Stress on Ethnic Minority Young Adult Self-Esteem and Anxiety

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

As emerging adults, minority college students are at increased risk for negative mental health outcomes and esteem issues. Factoring in acculturative stress and perceived discrimination exacerbates this risk (Gomez et al., 2011). How that discrimination is viewed and the adjustments made by the individual to become more acceptable to dominant culture affect the self-esteem of the individual (Hall et al., 2015). Previous research into acculturative stress and perceived discrimination rarely view mental health outcomes while also including self-esteem (Paukert et al., 2006; Wei et al, 2013). Relationships between these two factors provide insight into the mechanisms which affect psychological distress (Tonsing et al, 2016). The goal of the present study is to understand correlations among minority students in respect to levels of self-esteem and anxiety, due to acculturative stress and perceived discrimination. This study included approximately 35 college students, recruited from classes at a small liberal arts university in Northern California, as well as through Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. The four measures used to compare stressors and mental health outcomes were the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Beck Anxiety Inventory (Beck et al., 1988), Social, Attitudinal, Familial, and Environmental Acculturation Stress Scale-Short Version (Mena et al., 1983), and the Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire-Community Version (Brondolo et al., 2005). In an increasingly socially stratified country, results are expected to support the idea that minority students with higher acculturative stress and perceived discrimination levels have lower self-esteem and more anxiety symptoms than minority students with lower stress and discrimination levels. This research gives insight into the inner experiences of minority college students, which will serve to increase our understanding of ways to improve the mental health outcomes and overall experience for college students.

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Apr 17th, 6:00 PM Apr 17th, 7:00 PM

The Effects of Perceived Discrimination and Acculturative Stress on Ethnic Minority Young Adult Self-Esteem and Anxiety

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

As emerging adults, minority college students are at increased risk for negative mental health outcomes and esteem issues. Factoring in acculturative stress and perceived discrimination exacerbates this risk (Gomez et al., 2011). How that discrimination is viewed and the adjustments made by the individual to become more acceptable to dominant culture affect the self-esteem of the individual (Hall et al., 2015). Previous research into acculturative stress and perceived discrimination rarely view mental health outcomes while also including self-esteem (Paukert et al., 2006; Wei et al, 2013). Relationships between these two factors provide insight into the mechanisms which affect psychological distress (Tonsing et al, 2016). The goal of the present study is to understand correlations among minority students in respect to levels of self-esteem and anxiety, due to acculturative stress and perceived discrimination. This study included approximately 35 college students, recruited from classes at a small liberal arts university in Northern California, as well as through Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. The four measures used to compare stressors and mental health outcomes were the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Beck Anxiety Inventory (Beck et al., 1988), Social, Attitudinal, Familial, and Environmental Acculturation Stress Scale-Short Version (Mena et al., 1983), and the Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire-Community Version (Brondolo et al., 2005). In an increasingly socially stratified country, results are expected to support the idea that minority students with higher acculturative stress and perceived discrimination levels have lower self-esteem and more anxiety symptoms than minority students with lower stress and discrimination levels. This research gives insight into the inner experiences of minority college students, which will serve to increase our understanding of ways to improve the mental health outcomes and overall experience for college students.