Presentation Title

Misperceptions of ADHD and the Benefit of Inclusive Classroom Training

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Adolescents have been continuously over-diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and therefore, unnecessarily treated (Bruchmüller et al., 2012). Overdiagnosis mainly occurs due to a therapist’s perception of the patient and disorder being clouded by societal norms (Bruchmüller et al., 2012). I hypothesize that undergraduate students’ actual knowledge will be less accurate than their perceived knowledge of ADHD. I hypothesize that pre-service teachers will more accurately refer students who display ADHD than the general population of undergraduates. I hypothesize that pre-service teachers with more inclusive classroom training will more accurately refer students who display ADHD. The present study utilizes a sample of 25 undergraduate students at Dominican University of California. Students completed a survey consisting of a 33-item assessment, 2 vignette case assessments, and demographic questions. Perceived knowledge and actual knowledge of ADHD were tested using the Knowledge About Attention Deficit Disorder Questionnaire (KADD-Q) (Anderson et al., 2012), DSM-V Criteria Vignettes and Evaluation of ADHD Criteria (Ohan et al., 2008), and demographic questions created specifically for the study. The KADD-Q specifically measured participants’ actual knowledge of ADHD. The vignettes captured important DSM-V diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The demographic questions give statistical data for categorization of participants while additionally measuring participants’ perceived knowledge of ADHD. Results of the present study are expected to demonstrate a gap in actual and perceived knowledge of ADHD, as well as demonstrate that more accurate knowledge of ADHD comes from pre-service teachers due to inclusive classroom training.

keywords: education, school psychology, inclusive classrooms, ADHD, ADHD misperceptions

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Apr 17th, 6:00 PM Apr 17th, 7:00 PM

Misperceptions of ADHD and the Benefit of Inclusive Classroom Training

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Adolescents have been continuously over-diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and therefore, unnecessarily treated (Bruchmüller et al., 2012). Overdiagnosis mainly occurs due to a therapist’s perception of the patient and disorder being clouded by societal norms (Bruchmüller et al., 2012). I hypothesize that undergraduate students’ actual knowledge will be less accurate than their perceived knowledge of ADHD. I hypothesize that pre-service teachers will more accurately refer students who display ADHD than the general population of undergraduates. I hypothesize that pre-service teachers with more inclusive classroom training will more accurately refer students who display ADHD. The present study utilizes a sample of 25 undergraduate students at Dominican University of California. Students completed a survey consisting of a 33-item assessment, 2 vignette case assessments, and demographic questions. Perceived knowledge and actual knowledge of ADHD were tested using the Knowledge About Attention Deficit Disorder Questionnaire (KADD-Q) (Anderson et al., 2012), DSM-V Criteria Vignettes and Evaluation of ADHD Criteria (Ohan et al., 2008), and demographic questions created specifically for the study. The KADD-Q specifically measured participants’ actual knowledge of ADHD. The vignettes captured important DSM-V diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The demographic questions give statistical data for categorization of participants while additionally measuring participants’ perceived knowledge of ADHD. Results of the present study are expected to demonstrate a gap in actual and perceived knowledge of ADHD, as well as demonstrate that more accurate knowledge of ADHD comes from pre-service teachers due to inclusive classroom training.

keywords: education, school psychology, inclusive classrooms, ADHD, ADHD misperceptions