Presentation Title

The Effects of Higher Education Learning Environments on Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic Self-Concept, and Students' Academic Achievement

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Self-efficacy and self-concept are two important factors that play a role in the academic achievement of students (Fenning & May, 2013). There is significance in studying both due to the tendency of self-efficacy predicting academic achievement and self-concept predicting emotional and motivational factors (Ferla, Valcke, & Cai, 2009). Students’ self-efficacy levels in a learning environment have been shown to impact later decisions relating to academic choices (Fenning & May, 2013). One way to address current issues with traditional one-way learning environments is the creation of learning environments with a constructivist pedagogy (Alt, 2015). The present study focuses on determining the effects of perceived constructivist concepts in higher education learning environments on students’ academic self-efficacy, academic self-concept, and academic achievement. A sample of approximately 30 college students filled out a survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire that included asking for current cumulative academic GPA, the Constructivism in the Learning Environment Questionnaire (Tenenbaum et al., 2001), the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (Pintrich & De Groot., 1990), and several subscales (intellectual ability, scholastic competence, social acceptance, global self-worth) of Harter’s Self-Perception Profile for College Students (Harter & Neemann, 2012). Results are expected to illustrate that students with higher levels of self-efficacy and self-concept will have greater academic achievement. Additionally, students who perceive their college learning environments to be more constructivist will have higher levels of self-efficacy, better self-concept, and greater academic achievement. A better understanding of the effects of learning environments on self-efficacy, self-concept, and academic achievement will allow both teachers and students to create a more productive and meaningful educational experience.

Key Words: Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept, Academic Achievement, Learning Environments, Higher Education

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Apr 17th, 6:00 PM Apr 17th, 7:00 PM

The Effects of Higher Education Learning Environments on Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic Self-Concept, and Students' Academic Achievement

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Self-efficacy and self-concept are two important factors that play a role in the academic achievement of students (Fenning & May, 2013). There is significance in studying both due to the tendency of self-efficacy predicting academic achievement and self-concept predicting emotional and motivational factors (Ferla, Valcke, & Cai, 2009). Students’ self-efficacy levels in a learning environment have been shown to impact later decisions relating to academic choices (Fenning & May, 2013). One way to address current issues with traditional one-way learning environments is the creation of learning environments with a constructivist pedagogy (Alt, 2015). The present study focuses on determining the effects of perceived constructivist concepts in higher education learning environments on students’ academic self-efficacy, academic self-concept, and academic achievement. A sample of approximately 30 college students filled out a survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire that included asking for current cumulative academic GPA, the Constructivism in the Learning Environment Questionnaire (Tenenbaum et al., 2001), the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (Pintrich & De Groot., 1990), and several subscales (intellectual ability, scholastic competence, social acceptance, global self-worth) of Harter’s Self-Perception Profile for College Students (Harter & Neemann, 2012). Results are expected to illustrate that students with higher levels of self-efficacy and self-concept will have greater academic achievement. Additionally, students who perceive their college learning environments to be more constructivist will have higher levels of self-efficacy, better self-concept, and greater academic achievement. A better understanding of the effects of learning environments on self-efficacy, self-concept, and academic achievement will allow both teachers and students to create a more productive and meaningful educational experience.

Key Words: Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept, Academic Achievement, Learning Environments, Higher Education