Presentation Title

Exploring the Spatial Relationship Between Needles and HIV in San Francisco

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 3:00 PM

Department

Public Health

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Brett Bayles, PhD, MPH

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Clean needle exchange programs seek to reduce the incidence of HIV and other communicable diseases; however, in San Francisco an unintended consequence may be an increase in discarded needles in public places. This study uses public data provided by the San Francisco Department of Public Health to better understand geographic associations between needles and HIV. Spatial analysis was performed on georeferenced discarded needles and HIV incidence per census tract to quantify spatial relationships. Statistically significant hotspots of both needles and HIV were identified in the city. Needle hotspots had a high odds ratio even when accounting for poverty. The results of this analysis may be used to better guide targeted public health interventions.

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Exploring the Spatial Relationship Between Needles and HIV in San Francisco

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Clean needle exchange programs seek to reduce the incidence of HIV and other communicable diseases; however, in San Francisco an unintended consequence may be an increase in discarded needles in public places. This study uses public data provided by the San Francisco Department of Public Health to better understand geographic associations between needles and HIV. Spatial analysis was performed on georeferenced discarded needles and HIV incidence per census tract to quantify spatial relationships. Statistically significant hotspots of both needles and HIV were identified in the city. Needle hotspots had a high odds ratio even when accounting for poverty. The results of this analysis may be used to better guide targeted public health interventions.