Presentation Title

Athletic Injuries: Psychological Impacts and Athlete Preparedness to Return to Participation

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 5:00 PM

Department

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michaela George, PhD, MPH

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

In collegiate sports, the level of play can become extreme, even for the most talented athletes. According to the CDC, over 1 million injuries were estimated to occur in the 2013-2014 school year across the United States (CDC). It is evident that injuries are fairly common in college athletics, but there is more to just physical injury that takes a toll on the athlete. Psychological factors also come into play when dealing with a severe injury that can sideline an athlete for an extended period of time. While physical rehabilitation is always the number one goal for an athletic trainer or physician, many overlook the mental impact the injury may have on the athlete. (Clement, et al.) There are three proposed stages of injury: acute injury, repair, and remodeling (Clement, et al.). While these are primarily focused on the physical injury, psychological factors are not taken into consideration. In a qualitative study, athletes were found to display more emotion and depression due to the sudden lack of involvement in their respective sport (Johnston & Caroll). Potentially, this can lead an athlete to lack motivation to properly rehabilitate the injury or to not be mentally prepared to return to participation if the proper psychological interventions are not taken. One of the most common psychological reactions, as well as the most commonly cited reason for athlete not returning to sport, that an injured athlete may experience during the course of their injury is re-injury anxiety. A very small portion of medical professionals have been educated on psychological interventions that may expedite the recovery time of athletic injuries (Sheinbein, Tripp, Podlog, et al.). In a recent study involving athletes and psychological interventions, 71.6% stated that mental training was beneficial in promoting a quicker rehabilitation process (Arvinen-Barrow, et al.). This project is designed to assess athletes with previous or current injuries and understand how athletic trainers and medical professionals utilize psychological interventions in injury rehabilitation. This project will target student-athletes from the NCAA Division II PacWest Conference, which includes Dominican University. This research will also help determine how mentally prepared these athletes are to return to their respective sports. A secondary analysis will also take place on the quality of medical care each university has in hopes of directly correlating this to the athlete's preparedness. References Arvinen-Barrow, M., Clement, D., Hamson-Utley, J., Zakrajsek, R. A., Lee, S., Kamphoff, C., et al. (2015). Athletes’ Use of Mental Skills during Sport Injury Rehabilitation. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 24(2), 189-197. doi:10.1123/jsr.2013-0148. Clement, D., Arvinen-Barrow, M., & Fetty, T. (2015). Psychosocial Responses during Different Phases of Sport-Injury Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Athletic Training, 50(1), 95-104. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.3.52. Centers for Disease Control. (2015). College Sports–Related Injuries— United States, 2009–10 through 2013–14 Academic Years; Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ mm6448a2.htm Johnston LH, Caroll D. The Context of Emotional Responses to Athletic Injury: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Sports Rehabilitation. 1998;7(3) 206-220. Sheinbein, S. Psychological Effect of Injury on the Athlete: A Recommendation for Psychological Intervention. Retrieved from http://www.amolsaxena.com/pdf/ PsychologicalEffectOfInjurySheinbein.pdf Tripp DA, Ebel-Lam A, Stanish W, Brewer BW, Birchard J. Fear of reinjury, negative affect, and catastrophizing predicting return to sport in recreational athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries at one year postsurgery. Rehabil Psychol 2007; 52(1):74-81. Podlog L, Eklund RC. High-level athletes’ perceptions of success in returning to sport following injury. Psychol Sport Exerc 2009; 10(5):535-544.

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Athletic Injuries: Psychological Impacts and Athlete Preparedness to Return to Participation

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

In collegiate sports, the level of play can become extreme, even for the most talented athletes. According to the CDC, over 1 million injuries were estimated to occur in the 2013-2014 school year across the United States (CDC). It is evident that injuries are fairly common in college athletics, but there is more to just physical injury that takes a toll on the athlete. Psychological factors also come into play when dealing with a severe injury that can sideline an athlete for an extended period of time. While physical rehabilitation is always the number one goal for an athletic trainer or physician, many overlook the mental impact the injury may have on the athlete. (Clement, et al.) There are three proposed stages of injury: acute injury, repair, and remodeling (Clement, et al.). While these are primarily focused on the physical injury, psychological factors are not taken into consideration. In a qualitative study, athletes were found to display more emotion and depression due to the sudden lack of involvement in their respective sport (Johnston & Caroll). Potentially, this can lead an athlete to lack motivation to properly rehabilitate the injury or to not be mentally prepared to return to participation if the proper psychological interventions are not taken. One of the most common psychological reactions, as well as the most commonly cited reason for athlete not returning to sport, that an injured athlete may experience during the course of their injury is re-injury anxiety. A very small portion of medical professionals have been educated on psychological interventions that may expedite the recovery time of athletic injuries (Sheinbein, Tripp, Podlog, et al.). In a recent study involving athletes and psychological interventions, 71.6% stated that mental training was beneficial in promoting a quicker rehabilitation process (Arvinen-Barrow, et al.). This project is designed to assess athletes with previous or current injuries and understand how athletic trainers and medical professionals utilize psychological interventions in injury rehabilitation. This project will target student-athletes from the NCAA Division II PacWest Conference, which includes Dominican University. This research will also help determine how mentally prepared these athletes are to return to their respective sports. A secondary analysis will also take place on the quality of medical care each university has in hopes of directly correlating this to the athlete's preparedness. References Arvinen-Barrow, M., Clement, D., Hamson-Utley, J., Zakrajsek, R. A., Lee, S., Kamphoff, C., et al. (2015). Athletes’ Use of Mental Skills during Sport Injury Rehabilitation. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 24(2), 189-197. doi:10.1123/jsr.2013-0148. Clement, D., Arvinen-Barrow, M., & Fetty, T. (2015). Psychosocial Responses during Different Phases of Sport-Injury Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Athletic Training, 50(1), 95-104. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.3.52. Centers for Disease Control. (2015). College Sports–Related Injuries— United States, 2009–10 through 2013–14 Academic Years; Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ mm6448a2.htm Johnston LH, Caroll D. The Context of Emotional Responses to Athletic Injury: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Sports Rehabilitation. 1998;7(3) 206-220. Sheinbein, S. Psychological Effect of Injury on the Athlete: A Recommendation for Psychological Intervention. Retrieved from http://www.amolsaxena.com/pdf/ PsychologicalEffectOfInjurySheinbein.pdf Tripp DA, Ebel-Lam A, Stanish W, Brewer BW, Birchard J. Fear of reinjury, negative affect, and catastrophizing predicting return to sport in recreational athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries at one year postsurgery. Rehabil Psychol 2007; 52(1):74-81. Podlog L, Eklund RC. High-level athletes’ perceptions of success in returning to sport following injury. Psychol Sport Exerc 2009; 10(5):535-544.