Presentation Title

Improving independence through cooking; a study of supporting individuals with autism in Marin County.

Location

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

4-16-2019 3:00 PM

Department

Health Sciences

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Michaela George, PhD, MPH

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability defined by diagnostic criteria that include deficits in social communication and social interaction, and the presence of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities that can persist throughout life (1). According to the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 1 in 59 children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups (2). With prevalence of ASD reaching nearly 3% in some communities and representing an increase of 150% since 2000, ASD is an urgent public health concern that could benefit from enhanced strategies to help identify ASD earlier (2). Over the years ASD awareness has become more apparent through television shows, movies, commercials, and books. In 2008, Autism Speaks launched the Global Autism Public Health (GAPH) Initiative the same year that the United Nation established World Autism Awareness Day. The GAPH is to develop systematic and sustainable solutions to enhance global awareness, public health policies, training, service delivery and research for ASD (3). Increasing general awareness can lead to earlier diagnoses, more effective interventions and improved access to services and support for individuals affected by the condition (4). The rewards of independence for a child are clear. An added sense of self-confidence and self-esteem and the ability to make their own decisions and blossom as an individual is what every parent dreams of when talking about individuals with ASD (6). Becoming more independent on daily living skills such as self-care, food preparation, and getting around the community can be a challenge for some individuals on the spectrum, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible (7). When individuals with ASD gain independence it helps them live a “normal” life as much as possible.

Two programs that are designed to help ASD individuals toward independence are Lifehouse ad Integrated Community Services. Lifehouse was incorporated in Marin County by a group of parents who wanted an educational program for their children with developmental disabilities. Their mission is to improve the quality of life for people with developmental disabilities in our community by providing a lifetime of compassionate support in an atmosphere of respect, inspiration, and purpose. They have many services including supported Living Program, Independent Living Services, Intermediate Care Facilities, Specialized Autism Services, Adaptive Technology Center, Great Expectations Inclusive Preschool, Advocacy, Affordable Housing Advocacy, Information and Referrals, Assessments, Individualized Day Services, Recreation & Travel, Teen Recreation Integration Program, and RecLife (9). At Integrated Community Services their mission is to forge partnerships between individuals with disabilities and our community to create a diverse and inclusive place for us all. Their services include employment, independent living skills, garden program, mental health, tailored day services, young adult services, and private case management (10).

Cooking programs can be used to help individuals with autism to establish and improve their independence. Through cooking programs they may learn how to properly use kitchen gadgets, make a grocery list, go shopping for their own food, meal preparation, and of course cooking meals for themselves and their family. Cooking programs also help individuals learn about a balanced meal and special diets that may benefit them throughout their lives. This is important for obesity or insufficient calorie intake. The CDC reports that the overall rate of obesity for individuals with disabilities is 57% higher than the general population (5). By having individuals prep their meals it can enhance nutrition, variety, socialization, and overall health (12).

With observations I will measure independence in individuals with autism by comparing two different programs in Marin County, one with and one without a cooking program. Through interviews with individuals with ASD, their parents, and aids I was able to get a greater sense of the programs involvement with developing or improving independence.

References:

(1) Sharma, S. R., Gonda, X., & Tarazi, F. I. (2018). Autism Spectrum Disorder:

Classification, diagnosis and therapy. Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 190, 91–104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2018.05.007

(2) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). (2018, May 17). Retrieved from

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/ss/ss6706a1.htm

(3) Juneau, G. (2018). UN Matters: Global awareness of autism spectrum disorder.

Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/international/pi/2015/06/autism-spectrum.aspx

(4) McIntosh, J. (2015, April 01). Raising awareness of the myths of autism spectrum

disorder. Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/291832.php

(5) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). (2018, April 26). Retrieved from

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

(6) Encouraging independence. (2017, September 27). Retrieved from

http://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/independence/encouraging-independence

(7) Daily Living Skills: A Key to Independence for People with Autism. (2014, April 10).

Retrieved from https://iancommunity.org/ssc/autism-adaptive-skills

(9) Lifehouse. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.lifehouseagency.org/ourservices

(10) Home. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.connectics.org/

(12) Goldschmidt, J., & Song, H. (2015). Active Engagement: Teaching Cooking Skills

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Improving independence through cooking; a study of supporting individuals with autism in Marin County.

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability defined by diagnostic criteria that include deficits in social communication and social interaction, and the presence of restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities that can persist throughout life (1). According to the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 1 in 59 children have been identified with autism spectrum disorder in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups (2). With prevalence of ASD reaching nearly 3% in some communities and representing an increase of 150% since 2000, ASD is an urgent public health concern that could benefit from enhanced strategies to help identify ASD earlier (2). Over the years ASD awareness has become more apparent through television shows, movies, commercials, and books. In 2008, Autism Speaks launched the Global Autism Public Health (GAPH) Initiative the same year that the United Nation established World Autism Awareness Day. The GAPH is to develop systematic and sustainable solutions to enhance global awareness, public health policies, training, service delivery and research for ASD (3). Increasing general awareness can lead to earlier diagnoses, more effective interventions and improved access to services and support for individuals affected by the condition (4). The rewards of independence for a child are clear. An added sense of self-confidence and self-esteem and the ability to make their own decisions and blossom as an individual is what every parent dreams of when talking about individuals with ASD (6). Becoming more independent on daily living skills such as self-care, food preparation, and getting around the community can be a challenge for some individuals on the spectrum, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible (7). When individuals with ASD gain independence it helps them live a “normal” life as much as possible.

Two programs that are designed to help ASD individuals toward independence are Lifehouse ad Integrated Community Services. Lifehouse was incorporated in Marin County by a group of parents who wanted an educational program for their children with developmental disabilities. Their mission is to improve the quality of life for people with developmental disabilities in our community by providing a lifetime of compassionate support in an atmosphere of respect, inspiration, and purpose. They have many services including supported Living Program, Independent Living Services, Intermediate Care Facilities, Specialized Autism Services, Adaptive Technology Center, Great Expectations Inclusive Preschool, Advocacy, Affordable Housing Advocacy, Information and Referrals, Assessments, Individualized Day Services, Recreation & Travel, Teen Recreation Integration Program, and RecLife (9). At Integrated Community Services their mission is to forge partnerships between individuals with disabilities and our community to create a diverse and inclusive place for us all. Their services include employment, independent living skills, garden program, mental health, tailored day services, young adult services, and private case management (10).

Cooking programs can be used to help individuals with autism to establish and improve their independence. Through cooking programs they may learn how to properly use kitchen gadgets, make a grocery list, go shopping for their own food, meal preparation, and of course cooking meals for themselves and their family. Cooking programs also help individuals learn about a balanced meal and special diets that may benefit them throughout their lives. This is important for obesity or insufficient calorie intake. The CDC reports that the overall rate of obesity for individuals with disabilities is 57% higher than the general population (5). By having individuals prep their meals it can enhance nutrition, variety, socialization, and overall health (12).

With observations I will measure independence in individuals with autism by comparing two different programs in Marin County, one with and one without a cooking program. Through interviews with individuals with ASD, their parents, and aids I was able to get a greater sense of the programs involvement with developing or improving independence.

References:

(1) Sharma, S. R., Gonda, X., & Tarazi, F. I. (2018). Autism Spectrum Disorder:

Classification, diagnosis and therapy. Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 190, 91–104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2018.05.007

(2) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). (2018, May 17). Retrieved from

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/ss/ss6706a1.htm

(3) Juneau, G. (2018). UN Matters: Global awareness of autism spectrum disorder.

Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/international/pi/2015/06/autism-spectrum.aspx

(4) McIntosh, J. (2015, April 01). Raising awareness of the myths of autism spectrum

disorder. Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/291832.php

(5) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). (2018, April 26). Retrieved from

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html

(6) Encouraging independence. (2017, September 27). Retrieved from

http://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/independence/encouraging-independence

(7) Daily Living Skills: A Key to Independence for People with Autism. (2014, April 10).

Retrieved from https://iancommunity.org/ssc/autism-adaptive-skills

(9) Lifehouse. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.lifehouseagency.org/ourservices

(10) Home. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.connectics.org/

(12) Goldschmidt, J., & Song, H. (2015). Active Engagement: Teaching Cooking Skills