Presentation Title

Environmental Impacts on the Occupational Performance of Non-binary Individuals

Location

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 3:20 PM

Department

Occupational Therapy

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Karen McCarthy, Phd, OT/L

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

This study explores the experiences of non-binary individuals in their performance of daily occupations and how environmental factors alter the ability to function in those occupations.

The present research uses a qualitative case study design. After the initial screening, based on exclusion and inclusion criteria, three to five participants are chosen via chain referral to participate in a two-step, semi-structured interview in order to collect qualitative data. The first interview captures the general impact of the interviewees’ identity on meaningful occupations. The second interview is centered around the use of photo-elicitation. The photos are used to elicit a conversation about the participants' environmental experiences, environmental barriers, and facilitators influencing occupational performance and participation. Braun and Clarke’s (2006) thematic analysis will be implemented for data analysis along with Dedoose software for codes and themes taken from transcribed interviews. Methods selected to uphold rigor and trustworthiness include member checking, consensus coding among researchers, audit trails, and monthly reflective meetings to decrease biases.

Current research addresses the transgender population, but does not often provide a distinction between binary and non-binary--in occupational science literature, it is severely lacking. This lack of acknowledgment in research could force those wanting to express another gender to fall into binary categories without the fluid choice of a non-binary identity. This study is taking current research a step further by allowing non-binary individuals to be the center focus and acknowledged as unique individuals while simultaneously addressing the gap in the literature of occupational science.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 17th, 3:20 PM

Environmental Impacts on the Occupational Performance of Non-binary Individuals

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

This study explores the experiences of non-binary individuals in their performance of daily occupations and how environmental factors alter the ability to function in those occupations.

The present research uses a qualitative case study design. After the initial screening, based on exclusion and inclusion criteria, three to five participants are chosen via chain referral to participate in a two-step, semi-structured interview in order to collect qualitative data. The first interview captures the general impact of the interviewees’ identity on meaningful occupations. The second interview is centered around the use of photo-elicitation. The photos are used to elicit a conversation about the participants' environmental experiences, environmental barriers, and facilitators influencing occupational performance and participation. Braun and Clarke’s (2006) thematic analysis will be implemented for data analysis along with Dedoose software for codes and themes taken from transcribed interviews. Methods selected to uphold rigor and trustworthiness include member checking, consensus coding among researchers, audit trails, and monthly reflective meetings to decrease biases.

Current research addresses the transgender population, but does not often provide a distinction between binary and non-binary--in occupational science literature, it is severely lacking. This lack of acknowledgment in research could force those wanting to express another gender to fall into binary categories without the fluid choice of a non-binary identity. This study is taking current research a step further by allowing non-binary individuals to be the center focus and acknowledged as unique individuals while simultaneously addressing the gap in the literature of occupational science.