Presentation Title

Mujeres or Monstros: Queenpins in the Drug Patriarchy

Location

Guzman 104, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:40 PM

Department

History

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jordan Lieser, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

This research aims to ask and answer three simple questions by using case studies that revolve around the entire drug patriarchy, which are why they get involved, how they get involved, and once in power what elements of the business do they involve themselves in to keep that power. With a brief recap of women’s involvement in the illicit trade from the 1900s to the 1930s and two perspectives of scholarly work in this field all but helps answer my research questions. Through a survey of cartel “queenpins,” women who have reached leadership positions in cartels, such as Griselda Blanco and Sandra Beltran and Yolanda Sarmiento, show that patriarchy is alive and well within the drug business. All three women became involved in the drug business in pursuit of money, fame, and respect; however, they differ from their male counterparts in how they involve themselves in the drug business. Griselda Blanco was shaped by her environment of Columbia and Yolanda Sarmiento by her environment of Argentina, Sandra Beltran was affiliated with policy officials who turned into drug cartel leaders. All three Queepins worked their way up the male-dominated ladder by being ruthless and cunning when pursuing the top spot of being the sole leaders of the drug cartel.

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Apr 17th, 2:40 PM

Mujeres or Monstros: Queenpins in the Drug Patriarchy

Guzman 104, Dominican University of California

This research aims to ask and answer three simple questions by using case studies that revolve around the entire drug patriarchy, which are why they get involved, how they get involved, and once in power what elements of the business do they involve themselves in to keep that power. With a brief recap of women’s involvement in the illicit trade from the 1900s to the 1930s and two perspectives of scholarly work in this field all but helps answer my research questions. Through a survey of cartel “queenpins,” women who have reached leadership positions in cartels, such as Griselda Blanco and Sandra Beltran and Yolanda Sarmiento, show that patriarchy is alive and well within the drug business. All three women became involved in the drug business in pursuit of money, fame, and respect; however, they differ from their male counterparts in how they involve themselves in the drug business. Griselda Blanco was shaped by her environment of Columbia and Yolanda Sarmiento by her environment of Argentina, Sandra Beltran was affiliated with policy officials who turned into drug cartel leaders. All three Queepins worked their way up the male-dominated ladder by being ruthless and cunning when pursuing the top spot of being the sole leaders of the drug cartel.