Presentation Title

Representation in S.T.E.M Practices

Location

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:00 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jennifer Lucko, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Supporting students, and helping them to feel confident is in the classroom has a large effect on a student’s learning. This study researches the positive effects of young girls’ and minorities’ confidence levels by being represented in S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) practices. It is important that everyone has the opportunity to feel like they can succeed, and do well in the classroom. The purpose of this study, is to observe how showing more examples of successful females and people of color in STEM fields, can improve confidence levels in students.

This study will ask the questions: (1). How does positive representation change young children’s minds about their abilities in S.T.E.M. practices? As well as, (2). How do teachers incorporate the representation of women and minorities in S.T.E.M. practices into their curricula? Through research in academic journals, and observations in an elementary fifth grade school classroom, the researcher will observe the effects of positive representation. The researcher concludes that by having active equal representation, students’ confidence levels were heightened. Every student in the class had the opportunity to be introduced to new role models in the fields that they were studying. This created a classroom environment that was open to new ideas and students that thrived off self confidence. This is an important topic to address in the classroom because without the positive connection between student and material, no long term learning will take place. This study shows that students’ confidence levels rise when they can connect themselves to the material, by equal representation, especially in S.T.E.M. practices. As a result, students learn more, and a healthy relationship of learning is installed into each of the students.

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Apr 17th, 2:00 PM

Representation in S.T.E.M Practices

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

Supporting students, and helping them to feel confident is in the classroom has a large effect on a student’s learning. This study researches the positive effects of young girls’ and minorities’ confidence levels by being represented in S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) practices. It is important that everyone has the opportunity to feel like they can succeed, and do well in the classroom. The purpose of this study, is to observe how showing more examples of successful females and people of color in STEM fields, can improve confidence levels in students.

This study will ask the questions: (1). How does positive representation change young children’s minds about their abilities in S.T.E.M. practices? As well as, (2). How do teachers incorporate the representation of women and minorities in S.T.E.M. practices into their curricula? Through research in academic journals, and observations in an elementary fifth grade school classroom, the researcher will observe the effects of positive representation. The researcher concludes that by having active equal representation, students’ confidence levels were heightened. Every student in the class had the opportunity to be introduced to new role models in the fields that they were studying. This created a classroom environment that was open to new ideas and students that thrived off self confidence. This is an important topic to address in the classroom because without the positive connection between student and material, no long term learning will take place. This study shows that students’ confidence levels rise when they can connect themselves to the material, by equal representation, especially in S.T.E.M. practices. As a result, students learn more, and a healthy relationship of learning is installed into each of the students.