Presentation Title

Using Bloom’s taxonomy to analyze an ocean acidification case study

Location

Guzman 111, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:20 PM

Department

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Diara Spain, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Bloom’s taxonomy is a framework useful in developing student learning objectives that increase cognitive skills. These skills range from knowledge and comprehension up to application and analysis. While this framework has been used in education, it is not often applied by science professors. Typically, science is taught through powerpoints or “chalk and talk” lectures, these are fast but not ideal to keep the attention of students. Therefore, we decided to test a case study for an environmental science course. A lecture was replaced with a three-part case study to teach the non-science majors about ocean acidification. The case study provided general science articles and supporting data to analyze. The survey they completed showed students successfully answered knowledge and comprehension questions, and the higher-order level of application and analysis questions. For example, when they were asked to describe ocean acidification over 82% were able to describe what ocean acidification is with precise vocabulary.

S.Herrera, T.Wells, (Diara Spain)

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Apr 17th, 2:20 PM

Using Bloom’s taxonomy to analyze an ocean acidification case study

Guzman 111, Dominican University of California

Bloom’s taxonomy is a framework useful in developing student learning objectives that increase cognitive skills. These skills range from knowledge and comprehension up to application and analysis. While this framework has been used in education, it is not often applied by science professors. Typically, science is taught through powerpoints or “chalk and talk” lectures, these are fast but not ideal to keep the attention of students. Therefore, we decided to test a case study for an environmental science course. A lecture was replaced with a three-part case study to teach the non-science majors about ocean acidification. The case study provided general science articles and supporting data to analyze. The survey they completed showed students successfully answered knowledge and comprehension questions, and the higher-order level of application and analysis questions. For example, when they were asked to describe ocean acidification over 82% were able to describe what ocean acidification is with precise vocabulary.

S.Herrera, T.Wells, (Diara Spain)