Presentation Title

Ocean Acidification in Intertidal Shore Crabs, ​Hemigrapsus nudus and Pachygrapsus crassipes

Location

Guzman 111, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 2:00 PM

Department

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Diara Spain, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Heightened human activity from power plants, factories, and vehicles have lead to increased carbon dioxide emissions flooding the atmosphere. These emissions dissolve into the marine environments resulting in ocean acidification. Invertebrate marine calcifiers, specifically those with calcium carbonate exoskeletons, are susceptible to damage. Our research investigates potential changes that increased acidification can have on the exoskeletons of Hemigrapsus nudus and Pachygrapsus crassipes; both intertidal crabs in Northern California. For a duration of six weeks, the crabs were kept in individual containers that recycled seawater from a chiller. The crabs were designated as either control or experimental, with a proportionate mix of both species. Control specimen were constantly subjected to a pH of 8.1 while experimental specimen were exposed to an average pH of 7.5. Biweekly, all crabs were weighed and measured. Our results show that increased acidification may be influencing the weight and calcification of these species’ exoskeletons.

This presentation was co-authored by Rick Justin Francisco, Briana Chavez, Chloe Mauricio, Edlyra Kate Romano, Taylor Wells, and Kimani Anderson.

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Apr 17th, 2:00 PM

Ocean Acidification in Intertidal Shore Crabs, ​Hemigrapsus nudus and Pachygrapsus crassipes

Guzman 111, Dominican University of California

Heightened human activity from power plants, factories, and vehicles have lead to increased carbon dioxide emissions flooding the atmosphere. These emissions dissolve into the marine environments resulting in ocean acidification. Invertebrate marine calcifiers, specifically those with calcium carbonate exoskeletons, are susceptible to damage. Our research investigates potential changes that increased acidification can have on the exoskeletons of Hemigrapsus nudus and Pachygrapsus crassipes; both intertidal crabs in Northern California. For a duration of six weeks, the crabs were kept in individual containers that recycled seawater from a chiller. The crabs were designated as either control or experimental, with a proportionate mix of both species. Control specimen were constantly subjected to a pH of 8.1 while experimental specimen were exposed to an average pH of 7.5. Biweekly, all crabs were weighed and measured. Our results show that increased acidification may be influencing the weight and calcification of these species’ exoskeletons.

This presentation was co-authored by Rick Justin Francisco, Briana Chavez, Chloe Mauricio, Edlyra Kate Romano, Taylor Wells, and Kimani Anderson.