Presentation Title

The Role of Family Structure and Home Environment During Adolescence on Development of Grit and Social Success in College

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 5:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

William Phillips, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Grit is a strong determinant of achievement in many aspects of life. Grit is a personality trait related to one’s tendency to strive for long-term goals with steady passion and effort (Duckworth, Tsukuyama, & Von Cullin, 2014). Grit has been shown to be indicative of student success in higher education (Duckworth & Quinn, 2009). Grittier students are more likely to retained by the college after a year and a half. Grit is also a better predictor of college retention than high school GPA, ACT and SAT scores (Braley et al. 2018).

Grit is one of many personality traits that have been shown to influence academic and social success of adolescents and young adults. These traits are established throughout childhood tend to remain constant throughout people’s lives. One of the objectives of personality assessment by psychologists is to predict the likelihood of specific outcomes for an individual in real-world scenarios (Wiggins, 1973). More current research indicates that the home environment and parenting has a significant effect on personality trait expression during adolescence (Iwase et al., 2000). begun to address how personality characteristics might predict social success of young people. Within the context of a college environment, researchers have found that certain personality traits such as Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness have a positive relationship with social success. (Cross, et al., 2012)

Given current research indicating that grit is central to academic and social success in college further psychological research is needed to investigate how childhood experiences of different home environments and family structures develop children with more grit. In addition, some prior research has suggested that the acquisition of personality traits, which are key to social success in college, are impacted by adolescent home and family experiences. (Braley et al, 2018) This also requires further research into how those adolescent home life experiences predict college success.

I hypothesize that college students with a more constant and stable adolescent family structure will measure higher in grit. In addition, I predict that grittier students will be more academically and socially successful in college. Finally, I predict a positive relationship between social success and academic success in college.

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The Role of Family Structure and Home Environment During Adolescence on Development of Grit and Social Success in College

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Grit is a strong determinant of achievement in many aspects of life. Grit is a personality trait related to one’s tendency to strive for long-term goals with steady passion and effort (Duckworth, Tsukuyama, & Von Cullin, 2014). Grit has been shown to be indicative of student success in higher education (Duckworth & Quinn, 2009). Grittier students are more likely to retained by the college after a year and a half. Grit is also a better predictor of college retention than high school GPA, ACT and SAT scores (Braley et al. 2018).

Grit is one of many personality traits that have been shown to influence academic and social success of adolescents and young adults. These traits are established throughout childhood tend to remain constant throughout people’s lives. One of the objectives of personality assessment by psychologists is to predict the likelihood of specific outcomes for an individual in real-world scenarios (Wiggins, 1973). More current research indicates that the home environment and parenting has a significant effect on personality trait expression during adolescence (Iwase et al., 2000). begun to address how personality characteristics might predict social success of young people. Within the context of a college environment, researchers have found that certain personality traits such as Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness have a positive relationship with social success. (Cross, et al., 2012)

Given current research indicating that grit is central to academic and social success in college further psychological research is needed to investigate how childhood experiences of different home environments and family structures develop children with more grit. In addition, some prior research has suggested that the acquisition of personality traits, which are key to social success in college, are impacted by adolescent home and family experiences. (Braley et al, 2018) This also requires further research into how those adolescent home life experiences predict college success.

I hypothesize that college students with a more constant and stable adolescent family structure will measure higher in grit. In addition, I predict that grittier students will be more academically and socially successful in college. Finally, I predict a positive relationship between social success and academic success in college.