Presentation Title

Gender Stereotypes and Relationship Equity and Satisfaction

Location

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The dichotomized phrase “men are from Mars, and woman are from Venus” has been used to disunite men and women along biological, emotional, and cognitive lines. Social constructs that promote gender stereotypes can have an impact on the suppression of biological responses (Brody, 1997). These constructs may give rise in behavior in men and women that are self-fulfilling to the stereotypes for the given gender role (Baez et al., 2017).

In addition, gender stereotypes influence the way men and women behave as they allow themselves to respond to a situation based on how they think they should through the view of stereotyped lenses (Berke, Reidy, Miller, & Zeichner, 2017). The goal of the present study is to explore if those that subscribe to gender stereotypes rate their relationships as more equitable than those that subscribe less to stereotypes and the role of social comparison in equity assessment. Participants in this study were 64 individuals in romantic relationships enrolled at Dominican University of California and recruited via social media. Participants were requested to complete a survey comprised of The Hatfield Measure (Guerrero, La Valley, & Farinelli, 2008) and BEM Measure (Bem, 1974). This study is expected to highlight equity one feels they receive in their relationship and how they self-report based on masculinity, femininity, and social desirability.

In the present I will be measuring gender stereotypes, relationship equity, and relationship satisfaction to understand the relationship between these three factors. I expect the results of the present study to be in line with past research (Donaghue & Fallon, 2003). I hypothesize that among people with strong gender stereotypes, comparative equity is positively correlated with satisfaction, and among people with weak gender stereotypes, relationship equity is positively correlated with satisfaction.

keywords: gender stereotypes, relationship, equity, satisfaction

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Apr 17th, 6:00 PM Apr 17th, 7:00 PM

Gender Stereotypes and Relationship Equity and Satisfaction

Guzman 202, Dominican University of California

The dichotomized phrase “men are from Mars, and woman are from Venus” has been used to disunite men and women along biological, emotional, and cognitive lines. Social constructs that promote gender stereotypes can have an impact on the suppression of biological responses (Brody, 1997). These constructs may give rise in behavior in men and women that are self-fulfilling to the stereotypes for the given gender role (Baez et al., 2017).

In addition, gender stereotypes influence the way men and women behave as they allow themselves to respond to a situation based on how they think they should through the view of stereotyped lenses (Berke, Reidy, Miller, & Zeichner, 2017). The goal of the present study is to explore if those that subscribe to gender stereotypes rate their relationships as more equitable than those that subscribe less to stereotypes and the role of social comparison in equity assessment. Participants in this study were 64 individuals in romantic relationships enrolled at Dominican University of California and recruited via social media. Participants were requested to complete a survey comprised of The Hatfield Measure (Guerrero, La Valley, & Farinelli, 2008) and BEM Measure (Bem, 1974). This study is expected to highlight equity one feels they receive in their relationship and how they self-report based on masculinity, femininity, and social desirability.

In the present I will be measuring gender stereotypes, relationship equity, and relationship satisfaction to understand the relationship between these three factors. I expect the results of the present study to be in line with past research (Donaghue & Fallon, 2003). I hypothesize that among people with strong gender stereotypes, comparative equity is positively correlated with satisfaction, and among people with weak gender stereotypes, relationship equity is positively correlated with satisfaction.

keywords: gender stereotypes, relationship, equity, satisfaction