Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Leadership Style and Personality Type in College Students

Location

Martin de Porres 102, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 5:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 5:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate - Honors

Faculty Mentor(s)

Matt Davis, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Good leaders do not limit themselves to one leadership style, but may use different strategies based on their own preferences and the group they are leading. A successful leader must evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each individual team member in order to ensure the most success in reaching a goal. The purpose of a leader is to provide the most ideal work environment for his or her followers to induce productivity. Research has shown that an individual’s personality type is related to his or her personality style and is a contributor to how well someone responds to a particular leadership style. The purpose of the present study was to look at the personality types of undergraduate college students and assess the relationship to their preferred leadership styles. Participants will include approximately 50 undergraduate students from a small, private university located in northern California. Participants were recruited ins three ways: via email to their supervisors, email to their professors, and through requests on my personal social media accounts. Participants were asked to complete an online survey that assessed their personality type including extraversion, openness, agreeableness, neuroticism, conscientiousness, and preferred leadership style. Although data collection has not been fully completed, it is expected that there will be a strong positive relationship between participants who score higher on the traits of openness and extraversion and leadership styles that allow for more interaction with others and creativity in decision making. It is also expected that there will be a strong positive relationship between participants who score higher on the traits of conscientiousness and neuroticism and leadership styles that allow for more independent work opportunities.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 17th, 5:00 PM Apr 17th, 5:30 PM

The Relationship Between Leadership Style and Personality Type in College Students

Martin de Porres 102, Dominican University of California

Good leaders do not limit themselves to one leadership style, but may use different strategies based on their own preferences and the group they are leading. A successful leader must evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each individual team member in order to ensure the most success in reaching a goal. The purpose of a leader is to provide the most ideal work environment for his or her followers to induce productivity. Research has shown that an individual’s personality type is related to his or her personality style and is a contributor to how well someone responds to a particular leadership style. The purpose of the present study was to look at the personality types of undergraduate college students and assess the relationship to their preferred leadership styles. Participants will include approximately 50 undergraduate students from a small, private university located in northern California. Participants were recruited ins three ways: via email to their supervisors, email to their professors, and through requests on my personal social media accounts. Participants were asked to complete an online survey that assessed their personality type including extraversion, openness, agreeableness, neuroticism, conscientiousness, and preferred leadership style. Although data collection has not been fully completed, it is expected that there will be a strong positive relationship between participants who score higher on the traits of openness and extraversion and leadership styles that allow for more interaction with others and creativity in decision making. It is also expected that there will be a strong positive relationship between participants who score higher on the traits of conscientiousness and neuroticism and leadership styles that allow for more independent work opportunities.