Presentation Title

The Efficacy of Live Music Therapy on Stress, Anxiety, and Depression Among College Students and Working Adults

Location

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

4-17-2019 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Veronica Fruiht, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

According to the World Health Organization, there are an estimated 264 million people living with Anxiety Disorders, and an estimated 322 million people living with Depression. Music therapy is evidence-based treatment that involves the use of music to influence physiological, psychological, and emotional functioning in a patient that is being evaluated, by a mental health professional (Luebner & Hinterberger, 2017). Recent studies have found that Music Therapy has often been used as an alternative therapy to bridge the gap between home treatment and hospitalization for people suffering with mental health disorders. (Luebner & Hinterberger, 2017). Researcher, Nilsson (2008), discovered that half of the 42 reviewed randomized control studies on music interventions used in relation to stress and anxiety, demonstrated that music was therapeutically beneficial. Live music has been found to be more effective than recorded music in decreasing anxiety levels in cancer patients and patients with mental health disorders in various studies (Bailey, 1983, Ferrer, 2007). A large body of evidence from multiple studies show live music to be significantly more effective in showing active neural responses in coma patients in hospice care (Standley, 2000; Magee 2005; as stated in Segall (2007). Chiasson et. al (2013) demonstrated that patients observed in an intensive ward unit experienced a decreased pain by 27% when exposed to live spontaneous harp music. This study hopes to explore how live music and frequent exposure to music can be therapeutic. It is hypothesized that 1). people who attend live music events have lower stress, anxiety, and depression than people who do not attend live music events; that 2.) the amount of live music that someone listens to is negatively correlated with stress, anxiety and depression; and that 3) the amount of recorded music that someone listens to is negatively correlated with stress, anxiety and depression.

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Apr 17th, 6:00 PM Apr 17th, 7:00 PM

The Efficacy of Live Music Therapy on Stress, Anxiety, and Depression Among College Students and Working Adults

Guzman 201, Dominican University of California

According to the World Health Organization, there are an estimated 264 million people living with Anxiety Disorders, and an estimated 322 million people living with Depression. Music therapy is evidence-based treatment that involves the use of music to influence physiological, psychological, and emotional functioning in a patient that is being evaluated, by a mental health professional (Luebner & Hinterberger, 2017). Recent studies have found that Music Therapy has often been used as an alternative therapy to bridge the gap between home treatment and hospitalization for people suffering with mental health disorders. (Luebner & Hinterberger, 2017). Researcher, Nilsson (2008), discovered that half of the 42 reviewed randomized control studies on music interventions used in relation to stress and anxiety, demonstrated that music was therapeutically beneficial. Live music has been found to be more effective than recorded music in decreasing anxiety levels in cancer patients and patients with mental health disorders in various studies (Bailey, 1983, Ferrer, 2007). A large body of evidence from multiple studies show live music to be significantly more effective in showing active neural responses in coma patients in hospice care (Standley, 2000; Magee 2005; as stated in Segall (2007). Chiasson et. al (2013) demonstrated that patients observed in an intensive ward unit experienced a decreased pain by 27% when exposed to live spontaneous harp music. This study hopes to explore how live music and frequent exposure to music can be therapeutic. It is hypothesized that 1). people who attend live music events have lower stress, anxiety, and depression than people who do not attend live music events; that 2.) the amount of live music that someone listens to is negatively correlated with stress, anxiety and depression; and that 3) the amount of recorded music that someone listens to is negatively correlated with stress, anxiety and depression.