Presentation Title

Video Modeling: Occupational Engagement in Adult Autism

Location

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-17-2019 1:40 PM

Department

Occupational Therapy

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor(s)

Laura Hess, PhD, OTR/L

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Video modeling (VM) is an evidence based practice (EBP) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). VM is a form of assistive technology (AT) that capitalizes on the visual learning strengths of individuals with ASD (Campbell, Morgan, Barnett, & Spreat, 2015). VM has been shown to support occupational engagement including activities of daily living, community participation, social engagement, and vocational skills (Franzone & Collet-Klingenberg, 2008; Hong et al., 2016). Research examined the impact on quality of life (QoL) on families of individuals with ASD and found a correlation between overall QoL with level of functional skills (Rattaz, Michelon, Roeyers, & Baghdadli, 2017; Marsak & Perry, 2018). There is currently a lack of strengths-based interventions available in naturalistic settings and lack of implementation due to lack of awareness and time needed to design customized VM. Despite, the success of custom-made videos, teachers still preferred the commercially available videos, due to the time and money required to produce custom videos, limiting the impact of the EBP (Mechling, Ayres, Foster, & Bryant, 2013). The purpose of our community development project is to execute a detailed needs assessment and create a customized video modeling library for our community partner serving teens and adults with ASD. Feedback data will be gathered from the community partner for each VM created regarding the following: clarity of video instructions, pace of instruction, effectiveness of additional visuals including text, color etc., and implementation strategies with ASD clients. Our community partner does not currently have an OT consultant, and there is a need for an OT lens when considering the design and implementation of VM supports for clients with ASD for engagement in meaningful occupations. VM has a place for OT intervention when serving the ASD community.

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Apr 17th, 1:40 PM

Video Modeling: Occupational Engagement in Adult Autism

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

Video modeling (VM) is an evidence based practice (EBP) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). VM is a form of assistive technology (AT) that capitalizes on the visual learning strengths of individuals with ASD (Campbell, Morgan, Barnett, & Spreat, 2015). VM has been shown to support occupational engagement including activities of daily living, community participation, social engagement, and vocational skills (Franzone & Collet-Klingenberg, 2008; Hong et al., 2016). Research examined the impact on quality of life (QoL) on families of individuals with ASD and found a correlation between overall QoL with level of functional skills (Rattaz, Michelon, Roeyers, & Baghdadli, 2017; Marsak & Perry, 2018). There is currently a lack of strengths-based interventions available in naturalistic settings and lack of implementation due to lack of awareness and time needed to design customized VM. Despite, the success of custom-made videos, teachers still preferred the commercially available videos, due to the time and money required to produce custom videos, limiting the impact of the EBP (Mechling, Ayres, Foster, & Bryant, 2013). The purpose of our community development project is to execute a detailed needs assessment and create a customized video modeling library for our community partner serving teens and adults with ASD. Feedback data will be gathered from the community partner for each VM created regarding the following: clarity of video instructions, pace of instruction, effectiveness of additional visuals including text, color etc., and implementation strategies with ASD clients. Our community partner does not currently have an OT consultant, and there is a need for an OT lens when considering the design and implementation of VM supports for clients with ASD for engagement in meaningful occupations. VM has a place for OT intervention when serving the ASD community.