Document Type

Article

Source

Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning

Publication Date

10-16-2021

ISSN

1469-9745

Volume

29

Issue

5

First Page

607

Last Page

625

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Receiving mentoring is associated with lasting career benefits ; however, less is known about long-term career gains for mentors. A national sample of retired academics were surveyed to examine associations between past mentoring behaviors and current evaluations of their careers. Participants (N = 277) were on average 73.6 (SD = 6.2) years old with 34.9 (SD = 8.0) years of occupational tenure and 7.7 (SD = 5.8) years post-retirement. Structural equation modeling results demonstrated that having more protégés (β = .19, p = .024) and engaging in more mentoring behaviors (β = .18, p = .027) were associated with objective career achievements. However, mentoring behaviors, and not the number of protégés, were linked to subjective career achievements (β = .33, p < .001). While prior research demonstrates that mentors experience short-term benefits from mentoring, the present study’s findings suggest that mentors may also experience long-term objective and subjective career benefits.

Publisher Statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning on October 16, 2021, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13611267.2021.1986797

Available for download on Friday, September 15, 2023

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