Graduation Date

12-2021

Document Type

Senior Thesis

Degree

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Primary Major

Nursing

Program Director

Andrea Boyle, PhD, FNAP

Thesis Advisor

Patricia Harris, PhD, RN

Abstract

There is a common misconception that the primary role of nurses is to follow doctors’ orders and treat patients who are currently suffering and experiencing pain. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes can be prevented and better managed if the population who is greatest at risk is better informed and educated on the disease. Different cultures and ethnicities have different foods that unfortunately puts them at risk to get diabetes. Hispanics typically follow a diet that is high in carbohydrates, saturated fats, and sugars that greatly contribute to the development of diabetes. Often, Hispanics are not educated enough to comprehend the toxicity and health consequences.

This thesis includes a review of the literature to investigate the extent of the problem and potential solutions. The research revealed that the problem is extensive and offered interventions to prevent diabetes amongst Hispanic youth, interventions to manage diabetes amongst Hispanic adults, and showed a potential connection between Hispanic adults with diabetes and health literacy. The literature showed a lack of research of interventions that can potentially be helpful to Hispanic youth. This paper proposes a study that focuses on targeting Hispanic young adults between the age of 18 and 29 to analyze how education level plays a role in following a strict exercise and diet regimen to decrease the probabilities of getting diabetes and better managing it. Participants in this study were recruited by researchers attending local community health clinics with a high Hispanic population, local Hispanic supermarkets, and adults schools.

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