Presentation Title

Relationality Reimagined

Major Field of Study

Humanities

Location

Dominican University of California (online)

Start Date

20-6-2021 11:00 AM

End Date

20-6-2021 11:40 AM

Abstract

Circe, by Madeline Miller, introduces readers to a reimagined version of the Greek goddess who hosted Odysseus for a year on her island Aiaia. Miller affords rare authority and agency to a female protagonist, creating a nuanced study of power, value, and perception absent from other portrayals of female characters in heroic epics. Circe's inner landscape reveals multi-faceted motives, reflections, regrets, and, ultimately, a surprising achievement that speaks to our mortal condition. Circe is not only a revisionist myth; it serves as a cautionary tale and cultural corrective that speaks to the urgent issues of our time.

Presenter Biography

Throughout her career in education, Brighid has worked in various settings, teaching kindergarten through high school. She pursued her interests in history, literature, philosophy, and religious studies while enrolled in the Master’s of Arts in Humanities program at Dominican University of California. Her senior thesis, Cultivating an Ecospiritual Imagination, synthesizes aspects of ecology, spirituality, and feminism, emphasizing reciprocity and relationship. She graduated in May 2020.

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Jun 20th, 11:00 AM Jun 20th, 11:40 AM

Relationality Reimagined

Dominican University of California (online)

Circe, by Madeline Miller, introduces readers to a reimagined version of the Greek goddess who hosted Odysseus for a year on her island Aiaia. Miller affords rare authority and agency to a female protagonist, creating a nuanced study of power, value, and perception absent from other portrayals of female characters in heroic epics. Circe's inner landscape reveals multi-faceted motives, reflections, regrets, and, ultimately, a surprising achievement that speaks to our mortal condition. Circe is not only a revisionist myth; it serves as a cautionary tale and cultural corrective that speaks to the urgent issues of our time.