Graduation Date

5-2022

Document Type

Master's Thesis

Degree

Master of Science

Program

Education

Program Director

Jennifer Lucko, PhD

First Reader

Katherine Lewis, PhD

Second Reader

Matthew E. Davis, PhD

Abstract

While many studies have examined the benefits of movement and kinesthetic learning on the engagement of all elementary school-aged children, especially those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or children with common characteristics or behaviors of ADHD (undiagnosed ADHD), less research exists on how the COVID-19 pandemic and hybrid learning affected and continues to impact the engagement of children, especially those with ADHD or undiagnosed ADHD. The purpose of this study was to investigate how teachers engage students, particularly those with ADHD or undiagnosed ADHD, in an elementary classroom using practices from movement, music, dance, and theater, especially during COVID-19. Additionally, my research explored how the pandemic and hybrid learning affected and continues to impact student engagement. This was a qualitative study in which data was collected through interviews with elementary teachers who taught before the COVID-19 pandemic, during the pandemic in a hybrid context, and are still currently teaching in a partially “post-pandemic” environment, to understand how the use of movement, dance, and theater impacted (and continues to impact) the engagement of their students, especially those with ADHD or undiagnosed ADHD. Findings indicated that before the pandemic, teachers had time and flexibility to incorporate movement, music, dance, and/or theater practices to engage all students. However, the pandemic drastically changed how teachers engaged all students. Now, in a partially “post-pandemic” environment, teachers are still dealing with the ramifications of the pandemic and are struggling to maintain the engagement of all students, especially those with ADHD or undiagnosed ADHD.

IRB Number

10992

Share

COinS