Title

Adapting International Relations to the Changing Landscape of American Higher Education (United States)

Document Type

Article

Source

International Studies Perspectives

ISSN

1528-3577

Volume

22

Issue

2

First Page

133

Last Page

137

Publication Date

5-2021

Department

Political Science and International Studies

Abstract

This forum explores how societal contexts affect how instructors teach introductory undergraduate courses in international relations (IR), global politics, and international studies. Contributors teach at universities in China, Ecuador, India, Morocco, South Africa, the United Kingdom– Scotland, and the United States. Because instructors vary the structure, content, and pedagogical approaches in their courses (and perhaps most in their introductory courses) to account for their students’ backgrounds, conditions, and paradigms, the discipline can learn about contemporary global patterns by putting regionally diverse pedagogical approaches in conversation with each other. A concluding essay explores emergent patterns of a global IR and sets up points for further conversation. The authors hope sharing their pedagogical strategies will inspire instructors to devote the creativity necessary to improve how they teach introductory IR courses in their own societal contexts.

Comments

Part of a larger collection of essays titled: Forum on Pedagogy: The Introductory Course in International Relations: Regional Variations

Share

COinS