Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

When Violence Becomes Normal: A Comparative Study of Countries with the Highest Rates of Domestic Violence Against Women

Location

Guzman 114, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 5:40 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 5:55 PM

Department

Political Science and International Studies

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Gigi Gokcek, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Thirty-five percent of women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence from an intimate partner; however, the prevalence of this varies widely across countries. Why do some countries experience higher rates of domestic violence towards women than other countries? When a country’s population is poor, undereducated, and isolated, a culture that accepts violence against women may be formed. Research that explores the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) is largely restricted to two lenses: health and community development, and these are often limited to individuals or villages. Studies that do approach domestic violence from a state level look primarily at health outcomes and the effects of violence. This paper attempts to identify contributing factors for domestic violence within countries. In this endeavor, this study closely observes the five countries in the world with the greatest prevalence of domestic violence, relying on interviews from individuals from the countries, and data on rates of education, rates of poverty, and degree of isolation. This information would allow policy makers and organizations to intervene and prevent violence in countries before it happens.

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Apr 20th, 5:40 PM Apr 20th, 5:55 PM

When Violence Becomes Normal: A Comparative Study of Countries with the Highest Rates of Domestic Violence Against Women

Guzman 114, Dominican University of California

Thirty-five percent of women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence from an intimate partner; however, the prevalence of this varies widely across countries. Why do some countries experience higher rates of domestic violence towards women than other countries? When a country’s population is poor, undereducated, and isolated, a culture that accepts violence against women may be formed. Research that explores the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) is largely restricted to two lenses: health and community development, and these are often limited to individuals or villages. Studies that do approach domestic violence from a state level look primarily at health outcomes and the effects of violence. This paper attempts to identify contributing factors for domestic violence within countries. In this endeavor, this study closely observes the five countries in the world with the greatest prevalence of domestic violence, relying on interviews from individuals from the countries, and data on rates of education, rates of poverty, and degree of isolation. This information would allow policy makers and organizations to intervene and prevent violence in countries before it happens.