Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Advocacy Group Use of Social Media to Inform, Mobilize, and Change Policy

Location

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 2:20 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 2:35 PM

Department

Political Science and International Studies

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Alison Howard, M.A. and Christian Dean, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The American political system has multiple access points that allow advocacy groups to influence policymaking. Research shows that advocacy groups believe using the new platform of social media helps them achieve organizational goals of informing and mobilizing. However, the research has not addressed how advocacy groups use social media to frame their message in order to engage their members in civic and political life. Kam (2007) argues that civic appeals, which are mentions of personal responsibility to government and society, cause people to seek out and retain more information. In theory, if people have more information they will be more likely to participate in civic and political life. Therefore, it is important for advocacy groups to frame their message in a way that maximizes people’s engagement. This study uses content analysis to examine how four advocacy groups utilized Facebook and Twitter during the 2016 presidential election to frame their message to educate and mobilize their followers. This study argues that advocacy groups did not use civic duty appeals in their social media posts, thus decreasing the potential engagement of their followers.

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Apr 20th, 2:20 PM Apr 20th, 2:35 PM

Advocacy Group Use of Social Media to Inform, Mobilize, and Change Policy

Guzman 113, Dominican University of California

The American political system has multiple access points that allow advocacy groups to influence policymaking. Research shows that advocacy groups believe using the new platform of social media helps them achieve organizational goals of informing and mobilizing. However, the research has not addressed how advocacy groups use social media to frame their message in order to engage their members in civic and political life. Kam (2007) argues that civic appeals, which are mentions of personal responsibility to government and society, cause people to seek out and retain more information. In theory, if people have more information they will be more likely to participate in civic and political life. Therefore, it is important for advocacy groups to frame their message in a way that maximizes people’s engagement. This study uses content analysis to examine how four advocacy groups utilized Facebook and Twitter during the 2016 presidential election to frame their message to educate and mobilize their followers. This study argues that advocacy groups did not use civic duty appeals in their social media posts, thus decreasing the potential engagement of their followers.