Dominican University of California
 

Location

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 5:20 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 5:35 PM

Department

Education

Student Type

Graduate

Faculty Mentor

Madalienne Peters, Ed.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Twice-exceptional students possess both high ability and learning disabilities. Due to the complex interaction of their gifts and disabilities, these students present challenges to both educators and parents alike in identifying and understanding their learning and growth needs. Most educators adopt a deficit approach when working with these learners; new research, however, calls for multi-dimensional, strengths-based approaches in order to more effectively engage these students into positive school experiences and academic growth. Strength-based approaches draw upon an understanding of the student’s strengths, interests, and talents to entice them into both more rewarding and difficult work; it also calls for a collaborative effort. Observation and interviewing play an important role in these approaches and can engender richer understandings. Parents and primary caregivers play a critical role in advocating for the needs of their twice-exceptional children. Parents’ advocacy efforts are most effective when they understand their twice-exceptional children’s needs and school processes and can clearly convey their knowledge and understandings to educators. In this study, information was gathered from a mixed-methods, strengths-based approach about a student’s strengths, interest and talents in order to fill a gap in knowledge regarding traditional assessment and intervention approaches. The researcher also explored how parents’ understandings of their child’s needs aligned with the child’s perception of those variables and how those understandings influenced their own advocacy efforts.

Keywords: twice-exceptional, strength-based assessment, gifted education, learning disabilities, parent advocacy

 
Apr 20th, 5:20 PM Apr 20th, 5:35 PM

Understanding the Learning & Advocacy Needs of a Twice-Exceptional Student Through A Strengths-Based Lens: A Case Study in California

Guzman 110, Dominican University of California

Twice-exceptional students possess both high ability and learning disabilities. Due to the complex interaction of their gifts and disabilities, these students present challenges to both educators and parents alike in identifying and understanding their learning and growth needs. Most educators adopt a deficit approach when working with these learners; new research, however, calls for multi-dimensional, strengths-based approaches in order to more effectively engage these students into positive school experiences and academic growth. Strength-based approaches draw upon an understanding of the student’s strengths, interests, and talents to entice them into both more rewarding and difficult work; it also calls for a collaborative effort. Observation and interviewing play an important role in these approaches and can engender richer understandings. Parents and primary caregivers play a critical role in advocating for the needs of their twice-exceptional children. Parents’ advocacy efforts are most effective when they understand their twice-exceptional children’s needs and school processes and can clearly convey their knowledge and understandings to educators. In this study, information was gathered from a mixed-methods, strengths-based approach about a student’s strengths, interest and talents in order to fill a gap in knowledge regarding traditional assessment and intervention approaches. The researcher also explored how parents’ understandings of their child’s needs aligned with the child’s perception of those variables and how those understandings influenced their own advocacy efforts.

Keywords: twice-exceptional, strength-based assessment, gifted education, learning disabilities, parent advocacy