Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Aggressive Driving Behavior

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Ian Madfes, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Aggression while driving is experienced by nearly everyone, whether they are victims of it or acting as the aggressor. The present research examines possible causes for aggressive driving behavior.

Women are less likely to express anger externally because they are more likely to experience anxiety or guilt, essentially internalizing their anger (Verona, Reed, Curtin, 2007). Other studies show that express aggression on the road is cathartic; venting frustration has the opposite effect and ends up fueling the anger rather than releasing it (Bushman, 2002).

Thompson et al (1993) studied the need for control of situations. They found that people most often sought a sense of mastery over stressors, believing they are capable of handling what may come next. Such research suggests that people have an underlying desire to be in control of situations and can feel agitated/uncomfortable when they are forced to no longer be in control (Pervin, 1963).

The aggressive driving response may result from individuals who are just generally aggressive in multiple situations. For those not normally aggressive, a sense of loss of control can be an additional source of anger. In a situation where a driver feels more agitation from a loss of control, this may be the foundation for the aggressive response. It is hypothesized that for individuals who are not usually aggressive, a display of increased driving anger issues related to a temporary increase in feelings of loss of control of the driving environment.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of driving anger, general aggressive behavior and needs for feeling of being in control of situations. Results will be available in April 2017.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

Aggressive Driving Behavior

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Aggression while driving is experienced by nearly everyone, whether they are victims of it or acting as the aggressor. The present research examines possible causes for aggressive driving behavior.

Women are less likely to express anger externally because they are more likely to experience anxiety or guilt, essentially internalizing their anger (Verona, Reed, Curtin, 2007). Other studies show that express aggression on the road is cathartic; venting frustration has the opposite effect and ends up fueling the anger rather than releasing it (Bushman, 2002).

Thompson et al (1993) studied the need for control of situations. They found that people most often sought a sense of mastery over stressors, believing they are capable of handling what may come next. Such research suggests that people have an underlying desire to be in control of situations and can feel agitated/uncomfortable when they are forced to no longer be in control (Pervin, 1963).

The aggressive driving response may result from individuals who are just generally aggressive in multiple situations. For those not normally aggressive, a sense of loss of control can be an additional source of anger. In a situation where a driver feels more agitation from a loss of control, this may be the foundation for the aggressive response. It is hypothesized that for individuals who are not usually aggressive, a display of increased driving anger issues related to a temporary increase in feelings of loss of control of the driving environment.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of driving anger, general aggressive behavior and needs for feeling of being in control of situations. Results will be available in April 2017.