Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Music and Stress Levels

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This project attempts to better to understand the power of music on people. This study is, therefore, helpful in explaining why we feel the way we do, sometimes. We often have a favorite song or a favorite radio station that makes us happy. If music is uplifting, it would seem that listening to music should be a stress reliever. Bray, Oliver, Graham, and Martin-Ginis (2013) noted that those who listened to uplifting music felt better than those who didn’t listen at all. This improvement in how one feels suggests that the person is less stressed. Good, Huang, and Zouszniewski (2010) studied music’s effects on cancer patients who were in the hospital. Surprisingly in some circumstances, music turned out to be a better pain reliever than medicine. Pain is stressful and its relief can make one feel better, relaxed and less stressed. In a 2014 study, Huber, Smieskova, Shroeder, and Studims showed that music improves functioning level, and that agitation lowers one’s functioning level. Those who function better are often under less stress. One would expect the effects on music to be relaxing. Most music is soothing, and enjoyable. This comfortable way of spending leisure time is good for a person. Music would therefore be expected to lower people’s stress. The hypothesis is that regular music listeners have less stress than those who do not listen regularly. Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of music listening habits in prior week and two measure of recent stress. Results will be available in April 2017.

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Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

Music and Stress Levels

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

This project attempts to better to understand the power of music on people. This study is, therefore, helpful in explaining why we feel the way we do, sometimes. We often have a favorite song or a favorite radio station that makes us happy. If music is uplifting, it would seem that listening to music should be a stress reliever. Bray, Oliver, Graham, and Martin-Ginis (2013) noted that those who listened to uplifting music felt better than those who didn’t listen at all. This improvement in how one feels suggests that the person is less stressed. Good, Huang, and Zouszniewski (2010) studied music’s effects on cancer patients who were in the hospital. Surprisingly in some circumstances, music turned out to be a better pain reliever than medicine. Pain is stressful and its relief can make one feel better, relaxed and less stressed. In a 2014 study, Huber, Smieskova, Shroeder, and Studims showed that music improves functioning level, and that agitation lowers one’s functioning level. Those who function better are often under less stress. One would expect the effects on music to be relaxing. Most music is soothing, and enjoyable. This comfortable way of spending leisure time is good for a person. Music would therefore be expected to lower people’s stress. The hypothesis is that regular music listeners have less stress than those who do not listen regularly. Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of music listening habits in prior week and two measure of recent stress. Results will be available in April 2017.