Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

The Impact of Early Childhood Education on the Development of Educationally Disadvantaged Individuals

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Maggie Benedict-Montgomery, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Disparity of education begins early in life and continues to affect children through adulthood. Studies have found that low income and ethnically diverse individuals are often educationally disadvantaged. The quality and type of Early Childhood Education that the child receives at an early age can be a critical factor in their development and success (Miller and Bizzell, 1984; Nguyen, 2011; Rapee, 2013). Research demonstrates that there are large differences in academic success and development between those who are educationally advantaged, with access to Early Childhood Education of high quality, and those who are educationally disadvantaged, either with access to Early Childhood Education of lower quality or no Early Childhood Education at all. For those who are members of minority ethnic and racial groups and those who are economically disadvantaged, ECE is linked to stronger academic skills and fewer risk taking behaviors at age 21 (Campbell, Ramey, Pungello, Sparling, and Miller-Johnson, 2002).

Approximately seventy-five ethnically and economically diverse college students will be recruited from a large 2-year community college and a small private liberal arts university. Participants will be asked to complete demographic questions regarding age, ethnicity, race, and gender as well as questions that indicate their experience with early childhood education during ages 2-5 and their parents’ income and education at that time. Students will then complete measures of current life satisfaction using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener et. al, 1985), college stress using the Title scale (author, date of publication), and academic motivation using the Title scale (author, date of publication). Data will be collected and analyzed in early 2017.

Correlational analyses will examine relationships between early childhood education attendance, academic motivation, college stress, and current life satisfaction. It is hypothesized that exposure to early childhood education will be related to lower college stress, higher academic motivation, and higher current life satisfaction for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The purpose of this research is to increase our understanding of the long-term effects of early childhood education for college students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

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Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

The Impact of Early Childhood Education on the Development of Educationally Disadvantaged Individuals

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Disparity of education begins early in life and continues to affect children through adulthood. Studies have found that low income and ethnically diverse individuals are often educationally disadvantaged. The quality and type of Early Childhood Education that the child receives at an early age can be a critical factor in their development and success (Miller and Bizzell, 1984; Nguyen, 2011; Rapee, 2013). Research demonstrates that there are large differences in academic success and development between those who are educationally advantaged, with access to Early Childhood Education of high quality, and those who are educationally disadvantaged, either with access to Early Childhood Education of lower quality or no Early Childhood Education at all. For those who are members of minority ethnic and racial groups and those who are economically disadvantaged, ECE is linked to stronger academic skills and fewer risk taking behaviors at age 21 (Campbell, Ramey, Pungello, Sparling, and Miller-Johnson, 2002).

Approximately seventy-five ethnically and economically diverse college students will be recruited from a large 2-year community college and a small private liberal arts university. Participants will be asked to complete demographic questions regarding age, ethnicity, race, and gender as well as questions that indicate their experience with early childhood education during ages 2-5 and their parents’ income and education at that time. Students will then complete measures of current life satisfaction using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener et. al, 1985), college stress using the Title scale (author, date of publication), and academic motivation using the Title scale (author, date of publication). Data will be collected and analyzed in early 2017.

Correlational analyses will examine relationships between early childhood education attendance, academic motivation, college stress, and current life satisfaction. It is hypothesized that exposure to early childhood education will be related to lower college stress, higher academic motivation, and higher current life satisfaction for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The purpose of this research is to increase our understanding of the long-term effects of early childhood education for college students from disadvantaged backgrounds.