Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Types of Self-CareThat Helps Alleviate Compassion Fatigue and Burnout, in Social Workers

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Health Sciences

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Michaela George, MPH, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Social workers experience an immense number of stressors in their work environment. For example, long exposure to the suffering of others, and being exposed to traumatic events and problems of others (Radley & Figley). According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics, social work is a growing career in the United States with more than 650,000 people employed with a degree in Social Work (BLS). Compassion fatigue is a chronic stress resulting in work that involves caring for others. It is a term that is used to describe behavior and emotions of those who have experienced trauma while helping others (Kapoulitsas & Corcoran 2015). Several authors have proposed that higher levels of job stress can result in compassion fatigue and burnout among social workers. (Glass & Hastings, 1992; Keidel; Lafer, 1991; Masuda; Vachon). Social Workers are exposed to individuals who are vulnerable and need assistance to solve and cope with problems (O’Halloran & Linton, 2000; Payne, 2001). As time goes on, being exposed to this everyday leads to an increase in levels of stress can lead to burnout or compassion fatigue (O’Halloran & Linton, 2000; Payne, 2001). Burnout and compassion fatigue can lead to a negative impact on self-confidence, negative thoughts about work, and a lack of care about work-related issues (Stamm, 2007). Previous studies have shown the types of self-care to alleviate compassion fatigue in Social Work students and interns (Harr & Moore, 2011). Focusing on different fields and settings of social work and their ways of self-care can help better raise awareness for future social workers on how to cope with compassion fatigue/burnout. The aim of this study is to acquire an understanding the work of social workers who are in different fields and work settings, and their experience of working with troubled clients; and seek the ways in which social workers can be protected from compassion fatigue/burnout. The focus groups and interviews will gather information on the following research questions: What types of self care helps alleviate “compassion fatigue and/or burnout” in social workers?

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Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

Types of Self-CareThat Helps Alleviate Compassion Fatigue and Burnout, in Social Workers

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Social workers experience an immense number of stressors in their work environment. For example, long exposure to the suffering of others, and being exposed to traumatic events and problems of others (Radley & Figley). According to the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics, social work is a growing career in the United States with more than 650,000 people employed with a degree in Social Work (BLS). Compassion fatigue is a chronic stress resulting in work that involves caring for others. It is a term that is used to describe behavior and emotions of those who have experienced trauma while helping others (Kapoulitsas & Corcoran 2015). Several authors have proposed that higher levels of job stress can result in compassion fatigue and burnout among social workers. (Glass & Hastings, 1992; Keidel; Lafer, 1991; Masuda; Vachon). Social Workers are exposed to individuals who are vulnerable and need assistance to solve and cope with problems (O’Halloran & Linton, 2000; Payne, 2001). As time goes on, being exposed to this everyday leads to an increase in levels of stress can lead to burnout or compassion fatigue (O’Halloran & Linton, 2000; Payne, 2001). Burnout and compassion fatigue can lead to a negative impact on self-confidence, negative thoughts about work, and a lack of care about work-related issues (Stamm, 2007). Previous studies have shown the types of self-care to alleviate compassion fatigue in Social Work students and interns (Harr & Moore, 2011). Focusing on different fields and settings of social work and their ways of self-care can help better raise awareness for future social workers on how to cope with compassion fatigue/burnout. The aim of this study is to acquire an understanding the work of social workers who are in different fields and work settings, and their experience of working with troubled clients; and seek the ways in which social workers can be protected from compassion fatigue/burnout. The focus groups and interviews will gather information on the following research questions: What types of self care helps alleviate “compassion fatigue and/or burnout” in social workers?