Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

The Psychological Bases for Different Patterns of Social Media Use

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Ian Madfes, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Social media is an outlet for many to stay constantly connected, yet usage varies widely. This study investigates some of the psychological reasons for differences in how people engage with social media

Previous research highlights the difference between text and image-based platforms and their effects on participant's loneliness and self-esteem. Pittman and Reich, (2016) found that image-based platforms, such as Snapchat, reduced participant’s loneliness by increased engagement in more meaningful interactions

Zalk et al. (2014) investigated the influence online and offline friendships have on children. Observing the positive and negative effects on the development of social skills for shy adolescents the found that adolescents developed social skills and increased confidence with peers through online encounters.

Some spend a significant amount of time reading blogs, watching videos, and engaging with strangers rather than close friends. Kraut and Burke (2015) reported that people, who have a positive sense of belonging, communicate with close friends online, and engage in a higher frequency. Whereas, people with low sense of social belonging, spend more time engaging with weak social ties, as they attempt to substitute offline interactions.

It is clear from past research that social media use is connected to potential reduction in feelings of despair and the frequency and types of use are tied to levels of friendship. Therefore, it is hypothesized that strong social support groups will use social media as a form of direct friend-to-friend communications, earmarked by frequent postings, but minimal time on the site. Those who have poor social support will troll sites for longer periods of time and make few if any entries.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of frequency/type/amount of social media use and levels of friendships. Results will be available in April 2017.

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Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

The Psychological Bases for Different Patterns of Social Media Use

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Social media is an outlet for many to stay constantly connected, yet usage varies widely. This study investigates some of the psychological reasons for differences in how people engage with social media

Previous research highlights the difference between text and image-based platforms and their effects on participant's loneliness and self-esteem. Pittman and Reich, (2016) found that image-based platforms, such as Snapchat, reduced participant’s loneliness by increased engagement in more meaningful interactions

Zalk et al. (2014) investigated the influence online and offline friendships have on children. Observing the positive and negative effects on the development of social skills for shy adolescents the found that adolescents developed social skills and increased confidence with peers through online encounters.

Some spend a significant amount of time reading blogs, watching videos, and engaging with strangers rather than close friends. Kraut and Burke (2015) reported that people, who have a positive sense of belonging, communicate with close friends online, and engage in a higher frequency. Whereas, people with low sense of social belonging, spend more time engaging with weak social ties, as they attempt to substitute offline interactions.

It is clear from past research that social media use is connected to potential reduction in feelings of despair and the frequency and types of use are tied to levels of friendship. Therefore, it is hypothesized that strong social support groups will use social media as a form of direct friend-to-friend communications, earmarked by frequent postings, but minimal time on the site. Those who have poor social support will troll sites for longer periods of time and make few if any entries.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics and measures of frequency/type/amount of social media use and levels of friendships. Results will be available in April 2017.