Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Coloring, Not Just for Kids: Testing the Effectiveness of Mandala Coloring in Reducing Anxiety

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 1:30 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Veronica Fruiht, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Coloring, not just for kids: Testing the effectiveness of mandala coloring in reducing anxiety

In the United States around 40 million adults suffer from anxiety disorders. This has led rise to new methods in reducing anxiety, one of which has been sweeping the bookstores nationwide: adult coloring. Mandala coloring is a popular element of adult coloring due to its structured design that helps individuals remove themselves from their negative thoughts by immersing themselves in the flow of coloring (Curry et al., 2005). Past research has also shown a link between anxiety and certain personality traits (Chamorro-Premuzic et al., 2008). The goal of the present study is to determine if coloring a mandala will decrease anxiety and if certain personality types will benefit more from this activity.

Forty individuals from a small liberal arts university in Northern California completed the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (Gosling, 2003) and brief demographic questions. Two problem solving tasks were given to increase anxiety, with the experimental group coloring a mandala for 5 minutes in between the two tasks and the control groups sitting in silence. Participants then completed the trait portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, 1983). An independent samples t-test is expected to demonstrate that coloring mandalas does reduce anxiety levels. The ANOVA test is also expected to reveal an interaction effect showing that among people with higher Neuroticism and lower Extroversion scores who also color a mandala will have significantly lower anxiety scores than those who have lower neuroticism and higher extroversion. This research is expected to support the current trend of adult coloring as a method for reducing anxiety. In a culture that is high-paced and filled with constant stressors this research gives insight into how personality types can be good indicators as to what activities individuals should spend their time doing while receiving the most benefits.

Keywords: anxiety, coloring, personality, mandala, big five

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Apr 20th, 12:30 PM Apr 20th, 1:30 PM

Coloring, Not Just for Kids: Testing the Effectiveness of Mandala Coloring in Reducing Anxiety

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Coloring, not just for kids: Testing the effectiveness of mandala coloring in reducing anxiety

In the United States around 40 million adults suffer from anxiety disorders. This has led rise to new methods in reducing anxiety, one of which has been sweeping the bookstores nationwide: adult coloring. Mandala coloring is a popular element of adult coloring due to its structured design that helps individuals remove themselves from their negative thoughts by immersing themselves in the flow of coloring (Curry et al., 2005). Past research has also shown a link between anxiety and certain personality traits (Chamorro-Premuzic et al., 2008). The goal of the present study is to determine if coloring a mandala will decrease anxiety and if certain personality types will benefit more from this activity.

Forty individuals from a small liberal arts university in Northern California completed the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (Gosling, 2003) and brief demographic questions. Two problem solving tasks were given to increase anxiety, with the experimental group coloring a mandala for 5 minutes in between the two tasks and the control groups sitting in silence. Participants then completed the trait portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, 1983). An independent samples t-test is expected to demonstrate that coloring mandalas does reduce anxiety levels. The ANOVA test is also expected to reveal an interaction effect showing that among people with higher Neuroticism and lower Extroversion scores who also color a mandala will have significantly lower anxiety scores than those who have lower neuroticism and higher extroversion. This research is expected to support the current trend of adult coloring as a method for reducing anxiety. In a culture that is high-paced and filled with constant stressors this research gives insight into how personality types can be good indicators as to what activities individuals should spend their time doing while receiving the most benefits.

Keywords: anxiety, coloring, personality, mandala, big five