Dominican University of California
 

Presentation or Panel Title

Gender Differences in Choice to Attend College for Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families.

Location

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

Start Date

4-20-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

4-20-2017 7:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Student Type

Undergraduate

Faculty Mentor

Ian Madfes, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The present research will evaluate reasons for the current gender gap, where males make up 43% of college students, and why this pattern may differ with various cultural groups.

Gender differences in enrollment may be related to family structure. Doherty, Willoughby, and Wilde (2016) found a lower rate of males attending college when there was absence of father since birth. It is suggested that since growing up without a male figure that attended college there was no need for academic achievement because they did not have that same-gender role model. The absence of a father may also create a press for early employment by males, a factor that is much less true for female children.

According to Archaya and Joshi (2011), parental involvement in children’s academic is related to the academic achievement. Chun et al (2016) focused on Hispanic-serving schools and the relationship between cultural and psychosocial factors that contribute to attending college. They found that students show educational motivation from watching the sacrifice that their immigrant parents have had to make. The parents’ struggles with poverty and lack of education invoke a sort of parental involvement. This suggests that the parent’s low satisfaction of life is a source of motivation for the child to excel academically.

It is hypothesized that for immigrant families, with two parents who did not attend college, there will be a greater likelihood for boys to be encouraged to attend college if the male parent has low life satisfaction. The girls of the same family will be encouraged to attend college independent of the life satisfaction of either parent.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics, and measures of parental life satisfaction and degree to which male and female children are encouraged by parent to attend college. Results will be available in April 2017.

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Apr 20th, 6:00 PM Apr 20th, 7:00 PM

Gender Differences in Choice to Attend College for Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families.

Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican University of California

The present research will evaluate reasons for the current gender gap, where males make up 43% of college students, and why this pattern may differ with various cultural groups.

Gender differences in enrollment may be related to family structure. Doherty, Willoughby, and Wilde (2016) found a lower rate of males attending college when there was absence of father since birth. It is suggested that since growing up without a male figure that attended college there was no need for academic achievement because they did not have that same-gender role model. The absence of a father may also create a press for early employment by males, a factor that is much less true for female children.

According to Archaya and Joshi (2011), parental involvement in children’s academic is related to the academic achievement. Chun et al (2016) focused on Hispanic-serving schools and the relationship between cultural and psychosocial factors that contribute to attending college. They found that students show educational motivation from watching the sacrifice that their immigrant parents have had to make. The parents’ struggles with poverty and lack of education invoke a sort of parental involvement. This suggests that the parent’s low satisfaction of life is a source of motivation for the child to excel academically.

It is hypothesized that for immigrant families, with two parents who did not attend college, there will be a greater likelihood for boys to be encouraged to attend college if the male parent has low life satisfaction. The girls of the same family will be encouraged to attend college independent of the life satisfaction of either parent.

Methodology includes online data collection of demographics, and measures of parental life satisfaction and degree to which male and female children are encouraged by parent to attend college. Results will be available in April 2017.